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Ethics Check: Is High Fence Hunting Actually a Brilliant Business Idea?

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/ethics-check-is-high-fence-hunting-actually-a-brilliant-business-idea/

YouTube/Keith Warren
High Fence Hunting

Is high fence hunting a great business move?

Just saying the words “high fence operations” is enough to set most any dedicated gun or bowhunter off. High fenced hunting areas are the subject of near endless debate as hunters debate exactly what constitutes fair chase hunting.

But is a hunting ranch with canned hunts actually a brilliant business idea?

Well, let’s discuss it, and the place these type of operations have in the world of hunting, if any.

“Livestock”

It is hard to dig up the history of high fence hunting operations. From what I can tell, canned big game hunting operations have existed since at least the 1960s. I do know that the first experiments manipulating the genetic traits of whitetail deer to produce trophy bucks happened sometime in the 1970s.

Whatever the case may be, it’s been going on for a long time. Long enough that we know how profitable it is for the owners. In college I interviewed the owner of one of these facilities here in Michigan. The man was a lawyer by profession, but his side business was a high fence deer ranch that also specialized in exotic big game like wild boars.

In fact, the guy was gearing up for a major legal battle with the state of Michigan over the future of these types of hunting operations. The state was worried about getting a hog problem like Texas. But the owners of these types of ranches had a LOT of money invested in them and didn’t want to let that go without a fight.

War On Feral Hogs

But there is one thing I’ll never forget from that conversation I had with him as we discussed hogs behind high fences. He told me: “The pigs on my ranch are no different than a pink pig on a farm.”

Basically, this owner was telling me these weren’t wild animals. They were livestock. He was actively fighting to have them designated as such as far as the laws were concerned.

That livestock designation is something many of these deer hunting ranches seek. So, for the sake of this article, let’s not pretend these operations are working with “free range” animals, no matter how large their fenced-in area is. If the animal can’t freely leave the property (such as on a low fence ranch) they aren’t wild animals.

Basically, it’s hunting a zoo. How did this ever gain traction as a business idea?

Money talks

So, are high fence operations a great business idea? Technically, yes. I looked at several high fence “hunting experience” websites while researching this article. One of the sites I looked at had their “cull” hunts for bucks up to 139 inches priced in the $1,200 to $3,500 range. That’s for one deer. On the opposite end of that scale, hunts for bucks 200 inches and up were priced at nearly $8,000.

If the buck scored over 226 inches, the price was nearly $10,000, plus an additional $150 for each inch of antler past that. That means that anyone who shoots a 300-inch whitetail at this facility is out a cool $20,000, at least.

Another operation I looked at charges around $6,500 for a mature elk bull scoring 350 inches or more. Going back to the exotic swine again for a moment, one Missouri operation I looked up charges $1,000 a day to go after a boar up to 300 pounds. Another place I looked at in Texas only charged $400 a day, but that’s still a lot of money just to bring someone on your property, point at a pig, and let them shoot it.

So, technically speaking, yes, high fence operations are great business. But only for their owners. These places wouldn’t be everywhere if they weren’t. There is a lot of money to be made each hunting season.

It is little wonder the owner of these operations fight state agencies tooth and nail to try and preserve them.

Giving the customers what they want

At some point someone fenced in some deer and someone else paid them to go in and shoot them. In a way, I can’t blame the owner, intentional or not. Someone waved money in their face and they didn’t have to work for it.

They probably thought they were just giving deer hunters what they wanted.

Let’s face it, we’ve been conditioned to want this. All the whitetail deer hunting TV shows emphasize the harvest and trophy whitetail deer and other big game. We’re our own worst enemy in this regard. We can’t accept defeat.

This is why so many of these operations advertise a “100% success rate or your money back.”

Given how many poachers don’t bat an eye over their crimes and bragging about the deer they stole, it’s little wonder some hunters have no problem referring to a canned shoot of a 200-inch deer as a “whitetail hunt.”

The American way has always been about giving the people what they want. Sadly, what too many rich “hunters” want is a shortcut without the hard work of bagging a wild animal themselves.

So, in that sense, it actually is a brilliant business idea.

Ethically speaking

Those two points being said, ethically speaking, high fence hunting preserves SHOULD be a terrible business idea, for many reasons. But the biggest is the diseases that are cultivated and spread within them.

Let’s use Wisconsin as an example. In recent years, multiple facilities have tested positive for chronic wasting disease or CWD.

Four years ago, a new CWD containment area was opened up in Oneida County, Wisconsin as a result of a buck testing positive for the disease in a high fence operation called Three Lakes Trophy Ranch. That meant hunters of wild game were now subject to immediate baiting bans and carcass movement restrictions in a three-county area nearest the ranch, even though they had nothing to do with the place.

That ranch is still in operation and charging anywhere from $5000-10,000 a deer, plus a $2,000 deposit, according to their website. It’s bad enough they screwed things up for everyone else, but they’re still making money off it.

It’s not just the hunting operations either, but the farms that help supply the animals for this kind of thing. In 2016 an Eau Claire County Farm called Fairchild Whitetails had 33 animals escape their facility. Two of them were CWD-positive and spent months outside the fence, possibly spreading the disease to the wild herd.

Authorities quickly swept in and euthanized all the deer in the facility, but there’s another kick in the teeth to this story for Wisconsin hunters.

The state reimbursed the owner nearly $300,000 for the captive herd after the fact. Yep, if you’re a Wisconsin taxpayer in Eau Claire, Clark or Jackson County, your dollars went to reimbursing the people responsible for the CWD-containment zone in your area in the first place.

It all makes me wonder about the business associations these places have. What insurance agency looks at a high-risk place that hosts hunts and has no problems covering them? What veterinarian is OK with a place that raises animals to be shot like this?

All that, and many will still claim these places screw up things for hunters after wild animals. They’re putting wild herds at risk of disease. When these places mess up, they get bailed out by state agencies instead of punished. Ethically, this should be one of the worst businesses one could start up.

A bad look for hunting

It’s hard to get into the highly questionable ethics of pumping animals full of unnatural growth hormones. You can look at what the record keepers like Boone & Crockett think about high fence canned hunts. B&C is against them for the same reason I am. It comes down to fair chase.

Once again, at the end of the day, we are basically talking about animals comfined to a cage. They may eat natural food plots that grow there regardless of fences, but they can’t escape.

So many purist hunters, myself included, look at hunting ranches as places designed for some dude who can’t hunt, in need of something to brag about to his buddies.

If you read up a little on the clients of these places, you’ll unearth a lot of interesting stories from guides about people who only cared how many inches SCI their trophy animal would score.

Most of the people who buy animals at these places don’t seem to care about the experience of the hunt. They don’t care about fair chase, or disease, or how the operation may affect local hunters. They certainly don’t care about how it makes hunting look overall.

I’ve written in the past on how hunting is slowly dying out and by allowing businesses like high fence hunts to continue, we’re fast-tracking things. The average non-hunter who has no opinion on hunting is very likely to have a negative view of this so-called canned hunting.

All it takes is just one controversy at one of these operations to open the flood gates. We’ve seen it with the Cecil the Lion incident years ago. Overnight, a whole bunch of new anti-hunters were born. How long until something happens at one of these places to further soil the name of hunters everywhere?

“The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others,” – Teddy Roosevelt, 1907.

Roosevelt didn’t live long enough to see canned hunts. It’s a shame really. I would have loved to know what he would have had to say on the matter. But he did understand how important conservation is, and that’s what he’s talking about in that quote.

At the end of the day, we as hunters always refer to ourselves as conservationists. But to those who support high fence operations as a business idea, I have a question. What do these places do for conservation here in America other than tarnish the reputations and idea of hunters as conservationists?

These businesses are a great idea all right. One that ONLY benefits the bank accounts of owners and deer breeders. Think on that before you give one of these “businesses” your hard-earned dollars.

For more outdoor content from Travis Smola, be sure to follow him on Twitter and check out his Geocaching and Outdoors with Travis Youtube channels

NEXT: BEYOND MEAT: HOW THE PLANT-BASED FOOD INDUSTRY COULD AFFECT WILD GAME CONSUMPTION AND HUNTING

WATCH: TELLING THE HUNTING STORY MIGHT JUST SAVE IT

oembed rumble video here

The post Ethics Check: Is High Fence Hunting Actually a Brilliant Business Idea? appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

on

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/ethics-check-is-high-fence-hunting-actually-a-brilliant-business-idea/

YouTube/Keith Warren
High Fence Hunting

Is high fence hunting a great business move?

Just saying the words “high fence operations” is enough to set most any dedicated gun or bowhunter off. High fenced hunting areas are the subject of near endless debate as hunters debate exactly what constitutes fair chase hunting.

But is a hunting ranch with canned hunts actually a brilliant business idea?

Well, let’s discuss it, and the place these type of operations have in the world of hunting, if any.

“Livestock”

It is hard to dig up the history of high fence hunting operations. From what I can tell, canned big game hunting operations have existed since at least the 1960s. I do know that the first experiments manipulating the genetic traits of whitetail deer to produce trophy bucks happened sometime in the 1970s.

Whatever the case may be, it’s been going on for a long time. Long enough that we know how profitable it is for the owners. In college I interviewed the owner of one of these facilities here in Michigan. The man was a lawyer by profession, but his side business was a high fence deer ranch that also specialized in exotic big game like wild boars.

In fact, the guy was gearing up for a major legal battle with the state of Michigan over the future of these types of hunting operations. The state was worried about getting a hog problem like Texas. But the owners of these types of ranches had a LOT of money invested in them and didn’t want to let that go without a fight.

War On Feral Hogs

But there is one thing I’ll never forget from that conversation I had with him as we discussed hogs behind high fences. He told me: “The pigs on my ranch are no different than a pink pig on a farm.”

Basically, this owner was telling me these weren’t wild animals. They were livestock. He was actively fighting to have them designated as such as far as the laws were concerned.

That livestock designation is something many of these deer hunting ranches seek. So, for the sake of this article, let’s not pretend these operations are working with “free range” animals, no matter how large their fenced-in area is. If the animal can’t freely leave the property (such as on a low fence ranch) they aren’t wild animals.

Basically, it’s hunting a zoo. How did this ever gain traction as a business idea?

Money talks

So, are high fence operations a great business idea? Technically, yes. I looked at several high fence “hunting experience” websites while researching this article. One of the sites I looked at had their “cull” hunts for bucks up to 139 inches priced in the $1,200 to $3,500 range. That’s for one deer. On the opposite end of that scale, hunts for bucks 200 inches and up were priced at nearly $8,000.

If the buck scored over 226 inches, the price was nearly $10,000, plus an additional $150 for each inch of antler past that. That means that anyone who shoots a 300-inch whitetail at this facility is out a cool $20,000, at least.

Another operation I looked at charges around $6,500 for a mature elk bull scoring 350 inches or more. Going back to the exotic swine again for a moment, one Missouri operation I looked up charges $1,000 a day to go after a boar up to 300 pounds. Another place I looked at in Texas only charged $400 a day, but that’s still a lot of money just to bring someone on your property, point at a pig, and let them shoot it.

So, technically speaking, yes, high fence operations are great business. But only for their owners. These places wouldn’t be everywhere if they weren’t. There is a lot of money to be made each hunting season.

It is little wonder the owner of these operations fight state agencies tooth and nail to try and preserve them.

Giving the customers what they want

At some point someone fenced in some deer and someone else paid them to go in and shoot them. In a way, I can’t blame the owner, intentional or not. Someone waved money in their face and they didn’t have to work for it.

They probably thought they were just giving deer hunters what they wanted.

Let’s face it, we’ve been conditioned to want this. All the whitetail deer hunting TV shows emphasize the harvest and trophy whitetail deer and other big game. We’re our own worst enemy in this regard. We can’t accept defeat.

This is why so many of these operations advertise a “100% success rate or your money back.”

Given how many poachers don’t bat an eye over their crimes and bragging about the deer they stole, it’s little wonder some hunters have no problem referring to a canned shoot of a 200-inch deer as a “whitetail hunt.”

The American way has always been about giving the people what they want. Sadly, what too many rich “hunters” want is a shortcut without the hard work of bagging a wild animal themselves.

So, in that sense, it actually is a brilliant business idea.

Ethically speaking

Those two points being said, ethically speaking, high fence hunting preserves SHOULD be a terrible business idea, for many reasons. But the biggest is the diseases that are cultivated and spread within them.

Let’s use Wisconsin as an example. In recent years, multiple facilities have tested positive for chronic wasting disease or CWD.

Four years ago, a new CWD containment area was opened up in Oneida County, Wisconsin as a result of a buck testing positive for the disease in a high fence operation called Three Lakes Trophy Ranch. That meant hunters of wild game were now subject to immediate baiting bans and carcass movement restrictions in a three-county area nearest the ranch, even though they had nothing to do with the place.

That ranch is still in operation and charging anywhere from $5000-10,000 a deer, plus a $2,000 deposit, according to their website. It’s bad enough they screwed things up for everyone else, but they’re still making money off it.

It’s not just the hunting operations either, but the farms that help supply the animals for this kind of thing. In 2016 an Eau Claire County Farm called Fairchild Whitetails had 33 animals escape their facility. Two of them were CWD-positive and spent months outside the fence, possibly spreading the disease to the wild herd.

Authorities quickly swept in and euthanized all the deer in the facility, but there’s another kick in the teeth to this story for Wisconsin hunters.

The state reimbursed the owner nearly $300,000 for the captive herd after the fact. Yep, if you’re a Wisconsin taxpayer in Eau Claire, Clark or Jackson County, your dollars went to reimbursing the people responsible for the CWD-containment zone in your area in the first place.

It all makes me wonder about the business associations these places have. What insurance agency looks at a high-risk place that hosts hunts and has no problems covering them? What veterinarian is OK with a place that raises animals to be shot like this?

All that, and many will still claim these places screw up things for hunters after wild animals. They’re putting wild herds at risk of disease. When these places mess up, they get bailed out by state agencies instead of punished. Ethically, this should be one of the worst businesses one could start up.

A bad look for hunting

It’s hard to get into the highly questionable ethics of pumping animals full of unnatural growth hormones. You can look at what the record keepers like Boone & Crockett think about high fence canned hunts. B&C is against them for the same reason I am. It comes down to fair chase.

Once again, at the end of the day, we are basically talking about animals comfined to a cage. They may eat natural food plots that grow there regardless of fences, but they can’t escape.

So many purist hunters, myself included, look at hunting ranches as places designed for some dude who can’t hunt, in need of something to brag about to his buddies.

If you read up a little on the clients of these places, you’ll unearth a lot of interesting stories from guides about people who only cared how many inches SCI their trophy animal would score.

Most of the people who buy animals at these places don’t seem to care about the experience of the hunt. They don’t care about fair chase, or disease, or how the operation may affect local hunters. They certainly don’t care about how it makes hunting look overall.

I’ve written in the past on how hunting is slowly dying out and by allowing businesses like high fence hunts to continue, we’re fast-tracking things. The average non-hunter who has no opinion on hunting is very likely to have a negative view of this so-called canned hunting.

All it takes is just one controversy at one of these operations to open the flood gates. We’ve seen it with the Cecil the Lion incident years ago. Overnight, a whole bunch of new anti-hunters were born. How long until something happens at one of these places to further soil the name of hunters everywhere?

“The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others,” – Teddy Roosevelt, 1907.

Roosevelt didn’t live long enough to see canned hunts. It’s a shame really. I would have loved to know what he would have had to say on the matter. But he did understand how important conservation is, and that’s what he’s talking about in that quote.

At the end of the day, we as hunters always refer to ourselves as conservationists. But to those who support high fence operations as a business idea, I have a question. What do these places do for conservation here in America other than tarnish the reputations and idea of hunters as conservationists?

These businesses are a great idea all right. One that ONLY benefits the bank accounts of owners and deer breeders. Think on that before you give one of these “businesses” your hard-earned dollars.

For more outdoor content from Travis Smola, be sure to follow him on Twitter and check out his Geocaching and Outdoors with Travis Youtube channels

NEXT: BEYOND MEAT: HOW THE PLANT-BASED FOOD INDUSTRY COULD AFFECT WILD GAME CONSUMPTION AND HUNTING

WATCH: TELLING THE HUNTING STORY MIGHT JUST SAVE IT

oembed rumble video here

The post Ethics Check: Is High Fence Hunting Actually a Brilliant Business Idea? appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

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Hunting

This is What it's Like to Decapitate a Gobbler with The Judge Revolver

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/turkey-reaping-with-the-judge/

Facebook.com
the judge revolver

This close encounter with The Judge revolver gives turkey hunting a new look.

Fan hunting for turkeys, also known as reaping, has gained popularity in the past half decade. However, not many hunters choose the Judge revolver as their shotgun of choice.

This close encounter for Culpepper will give most hunters an adrenaline rush. Can you guess how many yards this shot is taken at?

I’ve personally never shot the Judge before, but from what I understand, it’s a revolver-turned-shotgun, typically loaded with a .410 cartridge. Because the .410 is a smaller shotgun shell size one would have to get closer than if they were hunting with a .12 or .20 gauge.

It apparently is possible to take out a turkey with a .410 if the shot is just right.

WARNING: Turkey reaping, while fun, is only recommended on private land where it is certain there are no other hunters. I hope it’s obvious after this video why that is the case. When you’re hiding behind a real turkey fan, hunters could get confused.

Like what you see here? You can read more awesome hunting articles by Nathan Unger at the Bulldawg Outdoors blog. Follow him on Twitter @Bulldawgoutdoor and on Instagram @Bulldawgoutdoors.

NEXT: Now This is Turkey Fan Hunting Done Right

oembed rumble video here

The post This is What it's Like to Decapitate a Gobbler with The Judge Revolver appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

on

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/turkey-reaping-with-the-judge/

Facebook.com
the judge revolver

This close encounter with The Judge revolver gives turkey hunting a new look.

Fan hunting for turkeys, also known as reaping, has gained popularity in the past half decade. However, not many hunters choose the Judge revolver as their shotgun of choice.

This close encounter for Culpepper will give most hunters an adrenaline rush. Can you guess how many yards this shot is taken at?

I’ve personally never shot the Judge before, but from what I understand, it’s a revolver-turned-shotgun, typically loaded with a .410 cartridge. Because the .410 is a smaller shotgun shell size one would have to get closer than if they were hunting with a .12 or .20 gauge.

It apparently is possible to take out a turkey with a .410 if the shot is just right.

WARNING: Turkey reaping, while fun, is only recommended on private land where it is certain there are no other hunters. I hope it’s obvious after this video why that is the case. When you’re hiding behind a real turkey fan, hunters could get confused.

Like what you see here? You can read more awesome hunting articles by Nathan Unger at the Bulldawg Outdoors blog. Follow him on Twitter @Bulldawgoutdoor and on Instagram @Bulldawgoutdoors.

NEXT: Now This is Turkey Fan Hunting Done Right

oembed rumble video here

The post This is What it's Like to Decapitate a Gobbler with The Judge Revolver appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Continue Reading

Hunting

Cooking: Wild Turkey Breakfast Sausage

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2019/05/cooking-wild-turkey-breakfast-sausage/

By MeatEater

Wild Turkey Apple Sausage Recipe

Ingrediants: 2 pounds skinless, boneless turkey legs (or a mix of legs and breast), cut into 1½-inch cubes 14 ounces thick-sliced bacon, cut into large pieces 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more as needed 1 large onion, diced 2 medium sweet and tart apples, such as Honeycrisp, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 2 to 2½ tablespoons packed brown sugar, or to taste 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves 2 tablespoons kosher salt 1 1/2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Zest of 1 lemon

Freeze the turkey meat and bacon on a baking sheet for 30 to 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring, until soft, about 8 minutes. Stir in the apples and continue to cook until soft, 6 to 8 minutes.

Transfer to a large plate, spread in a thin layer, and let cool in the refrigerator.

Grind the turkey and bacon into a large bowl set over a large bowl of ice. Add the cooled onions and apples, the sugar, thyme, salt, pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, and lemon zest. Mix well with your hands.

Pinch off a small bit of the sausage mixture and cook in a little oil in a skillet to test for seasoning. Adjust seasonings as necessary.

Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

Form patties with a slightly wet hand. I like to make them 3 inches in diameter because they’re easy to throw on the grill or in a pan, but you can make them any size you want.

Cooking: Preheat a cast-iron pan over medium heat and put a little oil in the pan. Working in batches, sear the sausage patties until browned on both sides and cooked throughout, 4 to 5 minutes per side.

Note: To freeze, stuff sausage into poly meat bags in ½-pound or 1-pound quantities, depending on how many people you typically serve. You can find all the special equipment used for this recipe at Weston Cooking Game: Wild Turkey Apple Sausage brought to you by Weston.

IDEO: Wild Turkey Apple Sausage For Breakfast, From MeatEater

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Published

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Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2019/05/cooking-wild-turkey-breakfast-sausage/

By MeatEater

Wild Turkey Apple Sausage Recipe

Ingrediants: 2 pounds skinless, boneless turkey legs (or a mix of legs and breast), cut into 1½-inch cubes 14 ounces thick-sliced bacon, cut into large pieces 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more as needed 1 large onion, diced 2 medium sweet and tart apples, such as Honeycrisp, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 2 to 2½ tablespoons packed brown sugar, or to taste 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves 2 tablespoons kosher salt 1 1/2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Zest of 1 lemon

Freeze the turkey meat and bacon on a baking sheet for 30 to 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring, until soft, about 8 minutes. Stir in the apples and continue to cook until soft, 6 to 8 minutes.

Transfer to a large plate, spread in a thin layer, and let cool in the refrigerator.

Grind the turkey and bacon into a large bowl set over a large bowl of ice. Add the cooled onions and apples, the sugar, thyme, salt, pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, and lemon zest. Mix well with your hands.

Pinch off a small bit of the sausage mixture and cook in a little oil in a skillet to test for seasoning. Adjust seasonings as necessary.

Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

Form patties with a slightly wet hand. I like to make them 3 inches in diameter because they’re easy to throw on the grill or in a pan, but you can make them any size you want.

Cooking: Preheat a cast-iron pan over medium heat and put a little oil in the pan. Working in batches, sear the sausage patties until browned on both sides and cooked throughout, 4 to 5 minutes per side.

Note: To freeze, stuff sausage into poly meat bags in ½-pound or 1-pound quantities, depending on how many people you typically serve. You can find all the special equipment used for this recipe at Weston Cooking Game: Wild Turkey Apple Sausage brought to you by Weston.

IDEO: Wild Turkey Apple Sausage For Breakfast, From MeatEater

Find Sportsman Channel in your area here: http://thesportsmanchannel.viewerlink…
Watch full MeatEater episodes here: http://meateater.vhx.tv
Shop our Merch Store: http://themeateaterstore.com
Follow us: Web: http://www.themeateater.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StevenRinell…
MeatEater on Twitter: https://twitter.com/meateatertv
Steven Rinella on Twitter: https://twitter.com/stevenrinella
Google +: http://bit.ly/YYdTzv
MeatEater Tumblr: http://themeateater.tumblr.com/
Trophy Country on Tumblr: http://trophycountry.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/meateatertv/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/meateatertv/

MORE:

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Continue Reading

Hunting

Disabled Vets Can Get a Free National Park Service Lifetime Access Pass

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/disabled-vets-can-get-a-free-national-park-service-lifetime-access-pass/

In case you didn’t know, here’s how disabled veterans can get a National Park Service Lifetime Access Pass completely free.

There are more than 300 million people who visit and enjoy our country’s National Parks, and gaining a Lifetime Pass is on the wish lists of outdoorsmen and women in every corner. And thanks to the VA’s VAntage Point blog, we were tipped off to a pretty sweet deal for a subgroup that’s deserving of having a wish like that granted.

In a sign of respect and a way to say thanks, the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Parks Service has granted entry into 400+ National Parks and over 2,000 recreation areas for those who have served and sacrificed for their country.

The Access Pass program makes them available for any U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States that have been medically determined to have a permanent disability

Veterans who have a Veteran’s Administration disability rating (10 percent or higher) can get the free lifetime Access Pass, and it isn’t even that difficult to obtain. It allows for the Pass owner and anyone inside their vehicle (for vehicle fee areas) or in their group (up to three other adults for per-person entrance fees) to get in without charges.

There are also discounts on expanded amenity fees like camping, swimming, boat launching, and guided tours for Access Pass holders.

Here’s how to apply:

In person at any participating federal recreation site. Present your photo identification (Drivers license, State ID, or Passport) and documentation proving a permanent disability (VA awards letter, VA ID with service connected annotation, VA summary of benefits, or receipt of Social Security disability income). The pass will be given to you then and there.

By mail with a completed Access Pass application form, proof of residency, and one of the following: a VA disability award letter, a VA summary of benefits, or proof of SSDI income. Send the acceptable documentation and a $10 processing fee to the United States Geological Survey (for full address and details, visit the link above). The pass will show up in the mail 10-12 weeks after receipt.

After that, you’ll just need to show a photo ID with the Access Pass, and you’re set to visit Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, the Everglades, or any number of other, beautiful outdoor places. There are millions of acres of Bureau of Land Management or Bureau of Reclamation lands, plus U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and USDA Forest Service lands to experience the greatness of our country’s historic and wild places. Our federal recreational lands really give meaning to “America the Beautiful.”

NEXT: HISTORIC OUTDOOR PEOPLE: JOHN MUIR, ‘FATHER OF THE NATIONAL PARKS’

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In case you didn’t know, here’s how disabled veterans can get a National Park Service Lifetime Access Pass completely free.

There are more than 300 million people who visit and enjoy our country’s National Parks, and gaining a Lifetime Pass is on the wish lists of outdoorsmen and women in every corner. And thanks to the VA’s VAntage Point blog, we were tipped off to a pretty sweet deal for a subgroup that’s deserving of having a wish like that granted.

In a sign of respect and a way to say thanks, the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Parks Service has granted entry into 400+ National Parks and over 2,000 recreation areas for those who have served and sacrificed for their country.

The Access Pass program makes them available for any U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States that have been medically determined to have a permanent disability

Veterans who have a Veteran’s Administration disability rating (10 percent or higher) can get the free lifetime Access Pass, and it isn’t even that difficult to obtain. It allows for the Pass owner and anyone inside their vehicle (for vehicle fee areas) or in their group (up to three other adults for per-person entrance fees) to get in without charges.

There are also discounts on expanded amenity fees like camping, swimming, boat launching, and guided tours for Access Pass holders.

Here’s how to apply:

In person at any participating federal recreation site. Present your photo identification (Drivers license, State ID, or Passport) and documentation proving a permanent disability (VA awards letter, VA ID with service connected annotation, VA summary of benefits, or receipt of Social Security disability income). The pass will be given to you then and there.

By mail with a completed Access Pass application form, proof of residency, and one of the following: a VA disability award letter, a VA summary of benefits, or proof of SSDI income. Send the acceptable documentation and a $10 processing fee to the United States Geological Survey (for full address and details, visit the link above). The pass will show up in the mail 10-12 weeks after receipt.

After that, you’ll just need to show a photo ID with the Access Pass, and you’re set to visit Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, the Everglades, or any number of other, beautiful outdoor places. There are millions of acres of Bureau of Land Management or Bureau of Reclamation lands, plus U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and USDA Forest Service lands to experience the greatness of our country’s historic and wild places. Our federal recreational lands really give meaning to “America the Beautiful.”

NEXT: HISTORIC OUTDOOR PEOPLE: JOHN MUIR, ‘FATHER OF THE NATIONAL PARKS’

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