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Finding the Perfect Hunting Partner

Posted from: https://blog.eastmans.com/finding-the-perfect-hunting-partner/

As the old Special Forces adage goes, “Two is one, one is none.” meaning without a buddy watching your back you’re done. 

While it’s not the exact same as having a good hunting buddy, I would say they are definitely similar. When you have someone you train with, hunt with and that brings his own set of skills to the table, it will make you better. You will have someone to map study with, run theories by and glass better. You will not only hunt better but come tough times, you will have someone to suffer with. You will have someone by your side helping to deal with bad weather, grueling miles, sketchy climbs, long nights, pack outs and everything in between. I have a circle of friends I trust and hunt with and with a buddy on a hunt; we are safer and hunt more effective. 

You want to hunt with guys that share your same passion and guys who have your same ethics and morals. When hunting with buddies, you want to hunt with guys that make you better. Now, I don’t mean hunt with guys that have a bunch of good spots. I mean hunt with guys that make you a better hunter and better person. A hunting partner should be working just as hard as you are to find new spots, or different ideas on existing spots. Your hunting partner should be getting in workouts just like you are. Together you hold each other accountable, as no one wants to be the weak link for a hunt. 

Hunting partners should take their archery serious and always be practicing. If there is a way to help your buddy with his shooting or setup, it is your job to step in. Ultimately, you have to have the attitude that your buddy’s success is your success. The better your friends are around you, the better you will become. When you have a good hunting partner dedicated to the team and to the cause, you are an unstoppable force. 

For me above all else, a hunting buddy has to be honest 100% of the time. I just have to trust the information, whether it is the animals they saw or where they hunted. Now I don’t tell every spot I have and everything I know on our first hunt together. I make sure to always be honest and tell the truth about all encounters but it takes a while to build my trust. Once I have been in deep water with a guy, and I know I can trust them, I am an open book. My buddies and I have a modified code of ethics. By that I mean to never do anything shady. 

If a guy takes you to one of his honey holes, you have to respect that by not going back and pounding it without him. Even worse, never take any other hunting buddies to his spot. Just have respect for your hunting partner, as good spots are tough to come by and good hunting partners are even tougher. I find by keeping everything out in the open, most of the time a good friend will send me right to where the rut party is. Just make sure to talk and make sure you are not stepping on his toes. If a hunting buddy does something shady or something that doesn’t sit right with you, have a conversation about it and what you expect out of a good hunting partner. 

Now all this said, you do not have to ditch all your old hunting partners. You guys can grow and get better together. Start the conversation of how you want to do an extended hunt or how you want to accomplish more. Talk about the steps necessary to reach your goals like working out, scouting and shooting. Get you and your buddies on track to accomplish all of your goals. Keep each other accountable for getting in shooting and workouts. When you guys make plans for scouting and hunting, every guy has to stick to the plan for the allotted days. 

You have to figure out which dynamic works best for you and your hunting buddy on a hunt. Sometimes we will split up and hunt different drainages, then meet up and camp together. Sometimes we will split up for the day or might even split up for a couple days and then meet up. With a hunting buddy you can meet up and share your encounters and sightings, you will learn twice as much information about an area. I will also team up with a buddy hiking and hunting together. We will move together and get to the same vantage points to glass. We will work together to find animals before they see us. We will have discussions and try to work together to find and glass the best hunting grounds. While I usually hunt with one other partner, sometimes I have multiple buddies that want to go on a hunt. This dynamic can work too; you just have to be a bit more creative with your hunting dynamic. Hunting with a group is more challenging but if done right, you can gather tons of current information about where you are hunting. 

I used to believe that hunting with a partner would give me less opportunities and less stalks than hunting solo. I now believe the opposite is true. With a good solid partner who is hunting as hard as you are, you get more opportunity. You end up glassing more animals and end up covering more country. With two guys covering country, you will find the concentration of game you are after. I always say if I can find the party whether it’s bucks or bulls, it’s just a matter of time before I get an arrow in one. 

Once you find a shooter, now you have to make the decision of how you are going to hunt it. I always work out who is going to shoot before we approach. There is nothing worse than two buddies racing to get a shot; the animal will spook for sure. 

I will either say, “You take this stalk, I will get next one.” or give it over to the coin toss. Sometimes we will have it worked out beforehand, especially if I have a certain buck picked out and scouted or something like that. It’s better to have the conversation before. Remember, giving your buddy the stalk is the ultimate sacrifice but will always come back to you two fold. 

You have options when hunting with a partner. You can stalk solo with a buddy up on the vantage point giving hand signals. Just work out a few basic signals and make sure the buddy on the vantage point is visible with the background and you are golden. Another technique we will use is to set up one guy on the animals projected escape route while the other guy stalks the animal. This has worked really well for me and my crew and a lot of times it is tough to pick who has the highest percentage chance.

The final option is to stalk the animal together in a buddy stalk. I believe that when you get two skilled hunters making a stalk you can be more effective than solo stalking. This works great if you are doing any filming or if you both want to get in on the action. Same thing here, pick who is going to be the shooter and then work together to get into range. 

With the shooter picked out, you then choose who is going to lead the stalk. Usually the lead stalker is the shooter, that way when he messes up it’s on him. Every once in a while though, I will have skilled hunting buddies who want me to lead their stalk. Whichever the case, the lead stalker moves and the back stalker follows his every movement. There should be whisper conversations at every decision, where the critter is situated, what angle to take and how slow to move. 

As the back stalker, your job is to let your lead stalker be first over rises and around bends. The back stalker should take an angle off his back shoulder. Look where he is not, like off to his sides and out in front. As the back stalker you need to keep the team calm. It should sound like this, “Hey let’s slow down some more we are getting close.” Or “Take your time on the shot and execute.” Try to avoid statements like, “Dude that thing is a freaking monster!” 

It’s amazing when you are not shooting how calm and collected you are and you want to project that on your shooter. Have a system to get your buddies attention when you see something before he does. I have been on countless buddy stalks where the back stalker saves your bacon by catching the animal right before you spook it. Once you stalk for a while together, you will just hear the back stalker stop and you will freeze automatically. Until then a little “Psst” or tug on the back of the shirt will work. 

Once you are getting close and moving slow enough, SLOW DOWN. It’s all about knowing when to slow down and there is no worse feeling in the bowhunting woods than spooking a trophy before you ever get a chance at him. There is this feeling that rushes over all of us, as we get close, it is to hurry up and see if he is still there. In reality this is when you need to move the slowest. If you get there and he has moved off so be it, but if he is still there, he will be unspooked. The lead stalker sets the pace and the back guy goes that slow or even slower. The goal as the back stalker is not to screw it up, so you have to be even more silent than the lead guy. 

Once in range with two guys, now you gain a huge advantage. You can use the back stalker as your range finder. He can give you constant readings of range to your target. One move we make a lot is for the lead guy to draw his bow and rise slowly, with the back stalker right over his back shoulder rising with him. I used this technique multiple times this year, and it paid off for one of my buddies who harvested a good Six-point bull and antelope buck. 

Finding a good hunting partner can be tough but just make sure you are doing everything on your part. Be honest and always do what you say you are going to do. Be generous with stalks and opportunity. Help make your hunting buddies better by sharing information and theories. Be motivated and always be working out and shooting. Watch your buddies back and keep each other safe. 

The best way to find a good hunting partner is to BE a good hunting partner. Lead by example and make your hunting partners better. Sharing in a hunt with a good friend is having someone to share memories with. You experience highs and lows together and share in the success. When you find a good hunting partner as dedicated to his bowhunting as you are, you guys can accomplish anything. 

 

The post Finding the Perfect Hunting Partner appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

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Posted from: https://blog.eastmans.com/finding-the-perfect-hunting-partner/

hunting

As the old Special Forces adage goes, “Two is one, one is none.” meaning without a buddy watching your back you’re done. 

While it’s not the exact same as having a good hunting buddy, I would say they are definitely similar. When you have someone you train with, hunt with and that brings his own set of skills to the table, it will make you better. You will have someone to map study with, run theories by and glass better. You will not only hunt better but come tough times, you will have someone to suffer with. You will have someone by your side helping to deal with bad weather, grueling miles, sketchy climbs, long nights, pack outs and everything in between. I have a circle of friends I trust and hunt with and with a buddy on a hunt; we are safer and hunt more effective. 

You want to hunt with guys that share your same passion and guys who have your same ethics and morals. When hunting with buddies, you want to hunt with guys that make you better. Now, I don’t mean hunt with guys that have a bunch of good spots. I mean hunt with guys that make you a better hunter and better person. A hunting partner should be working just as hard as you are to find new spots, or different ideas on existing spots. Your hunting partner should be getting in workouts just like you are. Together you hold each other accountable, as no one wants to be the weak link for a hunt. 

Hunting partners should take their archery serious and always be practicing. If there is a way to help your buddy with his shooting or setup, it is your job to step in. Ultimately, you have to have the attitude that your buddy’s success is your success. The better your friends are around you, the better you will become. When you have a good hunting partner dedicated to the team and to the cause, you are an unstoppable force. 

For me above all else, a hunting buddy has to be honest 100% of the time. I just have to trust the information, whether it is the animals they saw or where they hunted. Now I don’t tell every spot I have and everything I know on our first hunt together. I make sure to always be honest and tell the truth about all encounters but it takes a while to build my trust. Once I have been in deep water with a guy, and I know I can trust them, I am an open book. My buddies and I have a modified code of ethics. By that I mean to never do anything shady. 

If a guy takes you to one of his honey holes, you have to respect that by not going back and pounding it without him. Even worse, never take any other hunting buddies to his spot. Just have respect for your hunting partner, as good spots are tough to come by and good hunting partners are even tougher. I find by keeping everything out in the open, most of the time a good friend will send me right to where the rut party is. Just make sure to talk and make sure you are not stepping on his toes. If a hunting buddy does something shady or something that doesn’t sit right with you, have a conversation about it and what you expect out of a good hunting partner. 

Now all this said, you do not have to ditch all your old hunting partners. You guys can grow and get better together. Start the conversation of how you want to do an extended hunt or how you want to accomplish more. Talk about the steps necessary to reach your goals like working out, scouting and shooting. Get you and your buddies on track to accomplish all of your goals. Keep each other accountable for getting in shooting and workouts. When you guys make plans for scouting and hunting, every guy has to stick to the plan for the allotted days. 

You have to figure out which dynamic works best for you and your hunting buddy on a hunt. Sometimes we will split up and hunt different drainages, then meet up and camp together. Sometimes we will split up for the day or might even split up for a couple days and then meet up. With a hunting buddy you can meet up and share your encounters and sightings, you will learn twice as much information about an area. I will also team up with a buddy hiking and hunting together. We will move together and get to the same vantage points to glass. We will work together to find animals before they see us. We will have discussions and try to work together to find and glass the best hunting grounds. While I usually hunt with one other partner, sometimes I have multiple buddies that want to go on a hunt. This dynamic can work too; you just have to be a bit more creative with your hunting dynamic. Hunting with a group is more challenging but if done right, you can gather tons of current information about where you are hunting. 

I used to believe that hunting with a partner would give me less opportunities and less stalks than hunting solo. I now believe the opposite is true. With a good solid partner who is hunting as hard as you are, you get more opportunity. You end up glassing more animals and end up covering more country. With two guys covering country, you will find the concentration of game you are after. I always say if I can find the party whether it’s bucks or bulls, it’s just a matter of time before I get an arrow in one. 

Once you find a shooter, now you have to make the decision of how you are going to hunt it. I always work out who is going to shoot before we approach. There is nothing worse than two buddies racing to get a shot; the animal will spook for sure. 

I will either say, “You take this stalk, I will get next one.” or give it over to the coin toss. Sometimes we will have it worked out beforehand, especially if I have a certain buck picked out and scouted or something like that. It’s better to have the conversation before. Remember, giving your buddy the stalk is the ultimate sacrifice but will always come back to you two fold. 

You have options when hunting with a partner. You can stalk solo with a buddy up on the vantage point giving hand signals. Just work out a few basic signals and make sure the buddy on the vantage point is visible with the background and you are golden. Another technique we will use is to set up one guy on the animals projected escape route while the other guy stalks the animal. This has worked really well for me and my crew and a lot of times it is tough to pick who has the highest percentage chance.

The final option is to stalk the animal together in a buddy stalk. I believe that when you get two skilled hunters making a stalk you can be more effective than solo stalking. This works great if you are doing any filming or if you both want to get in on the action. Same thing here, pick who is going to be the shooter and then work together to get into range. 

With the shooter picked out, you then choose who is going to lead the stalk. Usually the lead stalker is the shooter, that way when he messes up it’s on him. Every once in a while though, I will have skilled hunting buddies who want me to lead their stalk. Whichever the case, the lead stalker moves and the back stalker follows his every movement. There should be whisper conversations at every decision, where the critter is situated, what angle to take and how slow to move. 

As the back stalker, your job is to let your lead stalker be first over rises and around bends. The back stalker should take an angle off his back shoulder. Look where he is not, like off to his sides and out in front. As the back stalker you need to keep the team calm. It should sound like this, “Hey let’s slow down some more we are getting close.” Or “Take your time on the shot and execute.” Try to avoid statements like, “Dude that thing is a freaking monster!” 

It’s amazing when you are not shooting how calm and collected you are and you want to project that on your shooter. Have a system to get your buddies attention when you see something before he does. I have been on countless buddy stalks where the back stalker saves your bacon by catching the animal right before you spook it. Once you stalk for a while together, you will just hear the back stalker stop and you will freeze automatically. Until then a little “Psst” or tug on the back of the shirt will work. 

Once you are getting close and moving slow enough, SLOW DOWN. It’s all about knowing when to slow down and there is no worse feeling in the bowhunting woods than spooking a trophy before you ever get a chance at him. There is this feeling that rushes over all of us, as we get close, it is to hurry up and see if he is still there. In reality this is when you need to move the slowest. If you get there and he has moved off so be it, but if he is still there, he will be unspooked. The lead stalker sets the pace and the back guy goes that slow or even slower. The goal as the back stalker is not to screw it up, so you have to be even more silent than the lead guy. 

Once in range with two guys, now you gain a huge advantage. You can use the back stalker as your range finder. He can give you constant readings of range to your target. One move we make a lot is for the lead guy to draw his bow and rise slowly, with the back stalker right over his back shoulder rising with him. I used this technique multiple times this year, and it paid off for one of my buddies who harvested a good Six-point bull and antelope buck. 

Finding a good hunting partner can be tough but just make sure you are doing everything on your part. Be honest and always do what you say you are going to do. Be generous with stalks and opportunity. Help make your hunting buddies better by sharing information and theories. Be motivated and always be working out and shooting. Watch your buddies back and keep each other safe. 

The best way to find a good hunting partner is to BE a good hunting partner. Lead by example and make your hunting partners better. Sharing in a hunt with a good friend is having someone to share memories with. You experience highs and lows together and share in the success. When you find a good hunting partner as dedicated to his bowhunting as you are, you guys can accomplish anything. 

 

The post Finding the Perfect Hunting Partner appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Hunting

Is an Automatic Knife a Smart or Risky EDC?

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/is-an-automatic-knife-a-smart-or-risky-edc/

Few things come in handy as often as an automatic knife, so why not carry one every day?

Carrying a knife is a great practice to get in the habit of, but to do so, you have to make sure you have the right knife.

Nowadays, automatic knives are garnering more attention than ever before, but they can pose somewhat of a risk as an everyday carry. You can’t deny the speed and convenience of an auto: one-hand is all it takes to open the knife and be fully ready to use it.

While stories have surfaced of serious accidents involving automatic knives over the years, manufacturers have prioritized safety more and more to reduce these accidents.

If you’re looking to start carrying an automatic knife, it’s always smart to do your research, even with the steady improvement of technology.

While there’s a fairly wide variety of knives that will effectively get the job done, two new models from a well-known name in the blade game deserve the spotlight.

Both of these American-made Kershaw knives stand out as safe, reliable and high-performing. Here’s why these would both make good examples of a top-notch EDC.

Kershaw Launch 1

Featuring a classic automatic look, the Launch 1 features a CPM 154 powdered metallurgy blade that opens in a hurry and stays locked. To release and close, you just push the button and fold the blade back into the handle. It’s extremely intuitive, and can be incorporated into the things you carry with you everyday with ease.

The highly durable steel blade holds a very sharp edge (thanks to a consistent distribution of carbides) for a long time and can battle against essentially all the elements. It takes on a BlackWash™ finish for a rugged look and a longer life expectancy. The blade finish helps protect the blade and helps hide common use scratches while enhancing the overall strength and performance.

Located on its lightweight, anodized-aluminum, contour-fitted handle is a low-profile push button, which greatly decreases the chances of an unintentional deploy. The Launch 1 has an ambidextrous pocket clip adjustment, meaning lefties would use their pointer finger to press the release button, instead of their thumb.

It’s an intelligently-made knife that feels familiar in the hand. If you aren’t used to carrying an automatic, it’s worth noting that the Launch 1 feels more familiar, giving you more trust in yourself each time you deploy it. It acts just like an automatic should, but without the intimidation factor.

Kershaw Launch 8

The Launch 8 is a very unique knife that dons more of an Italian stiletto look. That familiarity in the grip we just mentioned might go out the window with a unique design like this, but it’s the built-in features that still make it a smart everyday carry.

At only a featherweight 2.4 ounces, this knife weighs virtually nothing. It’s a very comfortable knife to carry, and with integrated finger guards and a low-profile button, it’s a safe one, too. That little bit of extra protection goes a long way.

Featuring a stonewashed CPM 154 powdered metallurgy steel blade, it’s tough, durable and holds a sharp edge. The pocket clip is reversible, so there’s no reason you’d have to carry the Launch 8 on the side of your non-dominant hand.

The gray, anodized-aluminum handle sports a carbon fiber insert, which covers the pivot to maintain a symmetrical look. It also helps promote a firm hold, decreasing the chances of it ever slipping.

An automatic knife doesn’t need to instantly scare people away from using it as an EDC. In fact, it could be a serious benefit for folks with arthritis or other dexterity issues. Just make sure you research the laws that govern who can own automatics and where they can be carried, but that should go without saying.

With enough practice and determined safe handling, carrying an automatic knife with you everywhere you go might be the best decision you make.

NEXT: GEAR PICKS: THE KERSHAW MULTI-TOOL

The post Is an Automatic Knife a Smart or Risky EDC? appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

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https://www.wideopenspaces.com/is-an-automatic-knife-a-smart-or-risky-edc/

hunting

Few things come in handy as often as an automatic knife, so why not carry one every day?

Carrying a knife is a great practice to get in the habit of, but to do so, you have to make sure you have the right knife.

Nowadays, automatic knives are garnering more attention than ever before, but they can pose somewhat of a risk as an everyday carry. You can’t deny the speed and convenience of an auto: one-hand is all it takes to open the knife and be fully ready to use it.

While stories have surfaced of serious accidents involving automatic knives over the years, manufacturers have prioritized safety more and more to reduce these accidents.

If you’re looking to start carrying an automatic knife, it’s always smart to do your research, even with the steady improvement of technology.

While there’s a fairly wide variety of knives that will effectively get the job done, two new models from a well-known name in the blade game deserve the spotlight.

Both of these American-made Kershaw knives stand out as safe, reliable and high-performing. Here’s why these would both make good examples of a top-notch EDC.

Kershaw Launch 1

hunting articles

Featuring a classic automatic look, the Launch 1 features a CPM 154 powdered metallurgy blade that opens in a hurry and stays locked. To release and close, you just push the button and fold the blade back into the handle. It’s extremely intuitive, and can be incorporated into the things you carry with you everyday with ease.

The highly durable steel blade holds a very sharp edge (thanks to a consistent distribution of carbides) for a long time and can battle against essentially all the elements. It takes on a BlackWash™ finish for a rugged look and a longer life expectancy. The blade finish helps protect the blade and helps hide common use scratches while enhancing the overall strength and performance.

Located on its lightweight, anodized-aluminum, contour-fitted handle is a low-profile push button, which greatly decreases the chances of an unintentional deploy. The Launch 1 has an ambidextrous pocket clip adjustment, meaning lefties would use their pointer finger to press the release button, instead of their thumb.

It’s an intelligently-made knife that feels familiar in the hand. If you aren’t used to carrying an automatic, it’s worth noting that the Launch 1 feels more familiar, giving you more trust in yourself each time you deploy it. It acts just like an automatic should, but without the intimidation factor.

Kershaw Launch 8

hunting websites

The Launch 8 is a very unique knife that dons more of an Italian stiletto look. That familiarity in the grip we just mentioned might go out the window with a unique design like this, but it’s the built-in features that still make it a smart everyday carry.

At only a featherweight 2.4 ounces, this knife weighs virtually nothing. It’s a very comfortable knife to carry, and with integrated finger guards and a low-profile button, it’s a safe one, too. That little bit of extra protection goes a long way.

Featuring a stonewashed CPM 154 powdered metallurgy steel blade, it’s tough, durable and holds a sharp edge. The pocket clip is reversible, so there’s no reason you’d have to carry the Launch 8 on the side of your non-dominant hand.

The gray, anodized-aluminum handle sports a carbon fiber insert, which covers the pivot to maintain a symmetrical look. It also helps promote a firm hold, decreasing the chances of it ever slipping.

An automatic knife doesn’t need to instantly scare people away from using it as an EDC. In fact, it could be a serious benefit for folks with arthritis or other dexterity issues. Just make sure you research the laws that govern who can own automatics and where they can be carried, but that should go without saying.

With enough practice and determined safe handling, carrying an automatic knife with you everywhere you go might be the best decision you make.

NEXT: GEAR PICKS: THE KERSHAW MULTI-TOOL

The post Is an Automatic Knife a Smart or Risky EDC? appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Continue Reading

Hunting

Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract

Posted from: http://huntinginsider.com/christensen-arms-awarded-sc-law-enforcement-division-sled-contract/

GUNNISON, Utah – (August 21, 2019) Christensen Arms has been awarded contract number 4400021290 by the State of South Carolina to produce a version of the Christensen Arms CA-15 G2 model firearm for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED). Under the contract, Christensen Arms will provide 410 semi-automatic rifles chambered in 223 WYLDE for the division. […]

The post Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract appeared first on HuntingInsider.

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Published

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Posted from: http://huntinginsider.com/christensen-arms-awarded-sc-law-enforcement-division-sled-contract/

GUNNISON, Utah – (August 21, 2019) Christensen Arms has been awarded contract number 4400021290 by the State of South Carolina to produce a version of the Christensen Arms CA-15 G2 model firearm for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED). Under the contract, Christensen Arms will provide 410 semi-automatic rifles chambered in 223 WYLDE for the division. […]

The post Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract appeared first on HuntingInsider.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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What’s Better than Popeyes AND Chick-fil-a? A Fried Pheasant Sandwich

https://www.fieldandstream.com/whats-better-than-popeyes-and-chick-fil-fried-pheasant-sandwich/

Behold—the fried rooster.

Behold—the fried rooster. (Colin Kearns/)

Before we begin, let me set the record straight: The new Popeyes chicken sandwich is better than the Chick-fil-a chicken sandwich—by a country-fried mile. OK, now that we’ve got that out the way, let’s move on to an even better sandwich, the fried rooster.

There are plenty of great ways to cook pheasant—roasted, made into soup, or grilled with a beer can up the rear—but my favorite method, at least with breast meat, is with hot oil in cast iron. With the exception of maybe wild turkey, pheasant fries better than just about any game I’ve ever cooked. The meat stays tender and moist, and pairs perfectly with a salty, crunchy, golden crust. And there’s no better way to eat fried pheasant than in a sandwich.

What sets this beauty apart from a Popeyes or Chick-fil-a sandwich—aside from, you know, the improved flavor you get from honest, organic, hard-earned meat—is that it’s easy to get. The first time I tried to order the Popeyes sandwich, they were already sold out by 1 p.m. The second time, I had to wait in line for 25 minutes, which is longer than it took me to cook the fried rooster. What’s more, the pheasant sandwich brought back some great memories of flushing birds with friends behind good dogs. All I got from the Popeyes sando was a stomachache.

Here’s how to make your own fried pheasant sandwich.

Ingredients

  • 2 pheasant breasts (or wild turkey breast meat)
  • Peanut oil
  • 1 cup whole flour
  • ⅓ cup cornmeal
  • ½ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. onion powder
  • ½ tsp. cayenne powder
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Buttermilk
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hot sauce
  • Brioche bun
  • Shredded lettuce
  • Dill pickle chips

Directions

  1. <p>Preheat the oil in a cast-iron skillet to 350 degrees.</p>
  2. <p>In a large bowl, mix the flour and cornmeal with the spices. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Pour enough buttermilk into a separate bowl so the pheasant breasts can take a bath in it. Set this bowl next to the one with the seasoned flour.</p>
  3. <p>Lightly coat the pheasant breasts in the seasoned flour, then dip them into the buttermilk. Let the excess milk run off, then drop the breasts back into the seasoned flour. Make sure you coat every bit of the breasts with the seasoned flour, because this will make for a crunchier sandwich.</p>
  4. <p>Place the pheasant breasts into the skillet and fry for about 3-4 minutes, or until golden brown. Once they’re finished cooking, transfer them to a plate or cutting board and immediately season with salt.</p>
  5. <p>Meanwhile, mix a few tablespoons of mayonnaise with several dashes of hot sauce, then generously coat both the top and bottom buns with the sauce. Add a pile of shredded lettuce to the bottom bun, top it with the pheasant breasts, and add a few dill pickles. Dig in and enjoy.</p>

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Behold—the fried rooster.

Behold—the fried rooster. (Colin Kearns/)

Before we begin, let me set the record straight: The new Popeyes chicken sandwich is better than the Chick-fil-a chicken sandwich—by a country-fried mile. OK, now that we’ve got that out the way, let’s move on to an even better sandwich, the fried rooster.

There are plenty of great ways to cook pheasant—roasted, made into soup, or grilled with a beer can up the rear—but my favorite method, at least with breast meat, is with hot oil in cast iron. With the exception of maybe wild turkey, pheasant fries better than just about any game I’ve ever cooked. The meat stays tender and moist, and pairs perfectly with a salty, crunchy, golden crust. And there’s no better way to eat fried pheasant than in a sandwich.

What sets this beauty apart from a Popeyes or Chick-fil-a sandwich—aside from, you know, the improved flavor you get from honest, organic, hard-earned meat—is that it’s easy to get. The first time I tried to order the Popeyes sandwich, they were already sold out by 1 p.m. The second time, I had to wait in line for 25 minutes, which is longer than it took me to cook the fried rooster. What’s more, the pheasant sandwich brought back some great memories of flushing birds with friends behind good dogs. All I got from the Popeyes sando was a stomachache.

Here’s how to make your own fried pheasant sandwich.

Ingredients

  • 2 pheasant breasts (or wild turkey breast meat)
  • Peanut oil
  • 1 cup whole flour
  • ⅓ cup cornmeal
  • ½ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. onion powder
  • ½ tsp. cayenne powder
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Buttermilk
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hot sauce
  • Brioche bun
  • Shredded lettuce
  • Dill pickle chips

Directions

  1. <p>Preheat the oil in a cast-iron skillet to 350 degrees.</p>
  2. <p>In a large bowl, mix the flour and cornmeal with the spices. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Pour enough buttermilk into a separate bowl so the pheasant breasts can take a bath in it. Set this bowl next to the one with the seasoned flour.</p>
  3. <p>Lightly coat the pheasant breasts in the seasoned flour, then dip them into the buttermilk. Let the excess milk run off, then drop the breasts back into the seasoned flour. Make sure you coat every bit of the breasts with the seasoned flour, because this will make for a crunchier sandwich.</p>
  4. <p>Place the pheasant breasts into the skillet and fry for about 3-4 minutes, or until golden brown. Once they’re finished cooking, transfer them to a plate or cutting board and immediately season with salt.</p>
  5. <p>Meanwhile, mix a few tablespoons of mayonnaise with several dashes of hot sauce, then generously coat both the top and bottom buns with the sauce. Add a pile of shredded lettuce to the bottom bun, top it with the pheasant breasts, and add a few dill pickles. Dig in and enjoy.</p>

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