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Hunter Recruitment…Do you want to see hunting go away?

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2018/04/hunter-recruitmentdo-you-want-to-see-hunting-go-away/

By: John Stallone

I am very concerned about the direction the “Hunting Industry” is heading. Aside from the Hunter on Hunter hate that runs rampid in social media, there is heavy competition and a general lack of comradery in today’s hunting culture. As a result, the non-hunting community portrays us as toothless hillbillies running around the woods shooting anything we see, or blood-thirsty savages only concerned with the kill and the trophy.

The media doesn’t help us at all; we get lumped in with crazed shooters and terrorists. The positive conservation work we do is never showcased; instead, only the negative. Even Disney movies teach our kids that hunters are bad. In every cartoon movie going back to Bambi, hunters are the bad guy. We have an almost impossible battle to fight. Unless you were brought up around hunting, it is societally ingrained that hunting and hunters are evil.  The only way that viewpoint is going to change is to focus on the youth and pray that future generations teach their kids the truth about hunting.

Get your kids into hunting

Right now, we don’t have a big enough voice. There is not one person in hunting or one platform big enough to reach non-hunters to try and sway the perception of what we do. Think about all the biggest names in hunting– almost none of them transcend hunting at all. It is up to all of us to recruit new hunters and to introduce our non-hunting friends, work colleagues and acquaintances to the positives of hunting and show them the respect we have for the animals we hunt. We must educate them on benefits of hunting that they can comprehend such as stewardship, conservation, and conservation funding. Because it is unlikely that you will be able to portray your passion for hunting in a manner that they will comprehend unless you are very persuasive and good with words.

Remember, anti-hunting groups have the most powerful tool working for them: negativity. People love to listen to the negative, the slander, and the distasteful. Think about everything you see on media today… Admit it, when you watch the news at night you are more likely to pay attention to the breaking news of some guy shooting up a convenience store than the piece on Grandma Lou who just had her 100th birthday. We don’t fight on the same playing field as they do, and our team is smaller, and we have fewer star players. They fight their battles in the public eye with big name celebs; we fight ours behind the scenes. Our fight is more noble, but nowhere near as effective.

We live with an unfortunate truth: the only reason hunting still exists is because of greed… Hunting is too big of an industry for the government to let it go away, otherwise we would have lost the war a long time ago. The popularity over Bambi would have prevailed over common sense. And since money is what makes the world go round, the government lets us have hunting. But let’s not take that for granted! If you want hunting to continue as we know it, stay involved, keep recruiting the youngsters and anyone you can because that is what saves us…

A little background on the current state of Hunting:

Hunter Recruitment:

Hunter Recruitment and Retention has been on a steady decline since the 1980’s: we’ve seen a decline of over 70% of licensed hunters since then. The current generation would rather engage in other activities than spend time in the outdoors hunting and fishing, experts project that with the steady decline and the eve-increasing opposition from anti-hunting groups hunting specifically will be very limited in this country for our great grand kids. Some say hunting as we know it will be gone by 2050. I, for one, am extremely grateful our forefathers took the time and effort to pave the way and to afford us the opportunities we have today, and I don’t want to (for lack of better terminology) “crap” on their hard work and devotion.

Get the kids involved in hunting

 The State of Hunting:

Participation in hunting has been generally declining since the 1980’s. The latest certified license data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service suggest that there are approximately 13.7 million hunters (4.09% of the U.S. population).  This is a significant decline in hunter participation from 1980, when there were 16.2 million license holders (7.1% of the U.S. population).  If the downward participation trend continues, it will result in diminished capacity of our state fish and wildlife agencies to conserve species cherished by both hunters and all other outdoor enthusiasts.

Hunting license sales produce essential funding each year for wildlife conservation and habitat restoration; without hunting participation the funding goes away. Excise taxes on hunting equipment generates millions for conservation each year. Moreover, our voice as a group gets quieter and quieter while the anti-groups get louder and louder. The one light at the end of the tunnel is that recent study showed that even though our numbers are dwindling, hunters of today are more engaged and spend more money per person than ever before making the hunting industry a revue producing juggernaut that lawmakers can’t ignore.

My Son Luca on his first coyote hunt

Why Hunters Drive Conservation:

“Hunters have a tremendous impact on the U.S. economy, spending over $38 billion each year.  Hunting creates and supports more than 680,000 jobs and generates $5.4 billion in state and local taxes.  If you add in federal taxes paid by hunters, the number doubles to $11.8 billion.  More importantly, hunters generate a critical amount of conservation dollars through the American System of Conservation Funding by purchasing hunting licenses, tags, and permits, and by paying excise taxes on a wide array of sporting equipment, including firearms, ammunition, archery equipment, and other hunting-related expenditures.  In total, monies paid by sportsmen and women provide 80% of the funding for state fish and wildlife agencies, the primary managers of our nation’s fish and wildlife resources.”

Why We Need to be Unified:

I mentioned it in my opening statement we spend way too much time and effort bashing each other.  We may not agree with each other’s methods or style, but as long as it’s legal and as long as it’s not foolishly airing distasteful content out for our enemies to exploit, then we should be supporting one another. At the least, not bashing each other. Why should we give them tinder for their fires?

When I see someone posting something distasteful, or post content that will create ill feeling towards hunters from non-hunters, I send them a direct message and let them know that they may want to rethink posting that content because it puts hunters in a bad position. I do my best not to engage in stupid debates, or get heated over social media about ignorant comments etc. I do my best. Tt doesn’t always work, and I can’t always contain my anger when I get personally attacked, but it’s in all our best interest to not engage in this type of activity. We need to try out best. Publically commenting on someone’s distasteful post isn’t helping us at all. Tt does, however, make the Facebook algorithm think the post is popular, causing the post to appear in more peoples’ news feeds, and eventually in the feed of an anti-hunter. Publically pointing out someone shortcomings or poking fun at fellow hunters doesn’t show a unified group and it doesn’t make for an environment that new hunters want to engage in.

The #Hunterup Initiative:

What’s the solution to all this negativity? The solution to the decline in hunting participation?

I would like to start an initiative to right this ship, stop fighting amongst ourselves, and most importantly, work on hunter recruitment. Hunter Recruitment and Retention is an important issue for anyone concerned about wildlife management, conservation and the future of our hunting heritage.

If 5% of us were able to bring on one new hunter a year, in 5 years we would reach hunter participation numbers we once had in the 1980’s. I challenge every hunter to recruit one at least one hunter into hunting each year, work with and foster their new interest. Help them learn to shoot, take their first animal, prep it, cook it, and enjoy it with their families. Then help them go hunt again.

I challenge those TV shows, Podcast Hosts, Bloggers, and influencers to push the #hunterup initiative. I also challenge everyone year-round to not engage in hunter on hunter hate or arguments in public forums. If you feel  strongly about a situation, respect your fellow hunter enough to contact that person directly in a private message. Take it off social media, show the world the strong unified, front of hunting.

I can already hear the whining… I know a lot of you are thinking to yourselves “I don’t want more competition in the woods”, “I already have a hard time finding a place to hunt, why do I want more people?” Sometimes it’s hard to see past our own wants and immediate needs and see the big picture. But I promise you, we will lose hunting rights and privileges if we fail to see the bigger picture. Or think about it like this, if you introduce a child into hunting, by the time he/she is an adult, it’s more than likely they won’t be direct competition for you anyway.

In the video below we discuss the benefits of taking a non-hunter and introducing them to hunting.

The inaugural launch of this initiative will be July first 2018 and each year in July we will have Hunter recruitment month with participants posting their pics and videos of their new hunting buddies with the hashtag #hunterup.

For more please go to: John Stallone

Connect With: John Stallone

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Published

on

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2018/04/hunter-recruitmentdo-you-want-to-see-hunting-go-away/

By: John Stallone

I am very concerned about the direction the “Hunting Industry” is heading. Aside from the Hunter on Hunter hate that runs rampid in social media, there is heavy competition and a general lack of comradery in today’s hunting culture. As a result, the non-hunting community portrays us as toothless hillbillies running around the woods shooting anything we see, or blood-thirsty savages only concerned with the kill and the trophy.

The media doesn’t help us at all; we get lumped in with crazed shooters and terrorists. The positive conservation work we do is never showcased; instead, only the negative. Even Disney movies teach our kids that hunters are bad. In every cartoon movie going back to Bambi, hunters are the bad guy. We have an almost impossible battle to fight. Unless you were brought up around hunting, it is societally ingrained that hunting and hunters are evil.  The only way that viewpoint is going to change is to focus on the youth and pray that future generations teach their kids the truth about hunting.

Get your kids into hunting

Right now, we don’t have a big enough voice. There is not one person in hunting or one platform big enough to reach non-hunters to try and sway the perception of what we do. Think about all the biggest names in hunting– almost none of them transcend hunting at all. It is up to all of us to recruit new hunters and to introduce our non-hunting friends, work colleagues and acquaintances to the positives of hunting and show them the respect we have for the animals we hunt. We must educate them on benefits of hunting that they can comprehend such as stewardship, conservation, and conservation funding. Because it is unlikely that you will be able to portray your passion for hunting in a manner that they will comprehend unless you are very persuasive and good with words.

Remember, anti-hunting groups have the most powerful tool working for them: negativity. People love to listen to the negative, the slander, and the distasteful. Think about everything you see on media today… Admit it, when you watch the news at night you are more likely to pay attention to the breaking news of some guy shooting up a convenience store than the piece on Grandma Lou who just had her 100th birthday. We don’t fight on the same playing field as they do, and our team is smaller, and we have fewer star players. They fight their battles in the public eye with big name celebs; we fight ours behind the scenes. Our fight is more noble, but nowhere near as effective.

We live with an unfortunate truth: the only reason hunting still exists is because of greed… Hunting is too big of an industry for the government to let it go away, otherwise we would have lost the war a long time ago. The popularity over Bambi would have prevailed over common sense. And since money is what makes the world go round, the government lets us have hunting. But let’s not take that for granted! If you want hunting to continue as we know it, stay involved, keep recruiting the youngsters and anyone you can because that is what saves us…

A little background on the current state of Hunting:

Hunter Recruitment:

Hunter Recruitment and Retention has been on a steady decline since the 1980’s: we’ve seen a decline of over 70% of licensed hunters since then. The current generation would rather engage in other activities than spend time in the outdoors hunting and fishing, experts project that with the steady decline and the eve-increasing opposition from anti-hunting groups hunting specifically will be very limited in this country for our great grand kids. Some say hunting as we know it will be gone by 2050. I, for one, am extremely grateful our forefathers took the time and effort to pave the way and to afford us the opportunities we have today, and I don’t want to (for lack of better terminology) “crap” on their hard work and devotion.

Get the kids involved in hunting

 The State of Hunting:

Participation in hunting has been generally declining since the 1980’s. The latest certified license data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service suggest that there are approximately 13.7 million hunters (4.09% of the U.S. population).  This is a significant decline in hunter participation from 1980, when there were 16.2 million license holders (7.1% of the U.S. population).  If the downward participation trend continues, it will result in diminished capacity of our state fish and wildlife agencies to conserve species cherished by both hunters and all other outdoor enthusiasts.

Hunting license sales produce essential funding each year for wildlife conservation and habitat restoration; without hunting participation the funding goes away. Excise taxes on hunting equipment generates millions for conservation each year. Moreover, our voice as a group gets quieter and quieter while the anti-groups get louder and louder. The one light at the end of the tunnel is that recent study showed that even though our numbers are dwindling, hunters of today are more engaged and spend more money per person than ever before making the hunting industry a revue producing juggernaut that lawmakers can’t ignore.

My Son Luca on his first coyote hunt

Why Hunters Drive Conservation:

“Hunters have a tremendous impact on the U.S. economy, spending over $38 billion each year.  Hunting creates and supports more than 680,000 jobs and generates $5.4 billion in state and local taxes.  If you add in federal taxes paid by hunters, the number doubles to $11.8 billion.  More importantly, hunters generate a critical amount of conservation dollars through the American System of Conservation Funding by purchasing hunting licenses, tags, and permits, and by paying excise taxes on a wide array of sporting equipment, including firearms, ammunition, archery equipment, and other hunting-related expenditures.  In total, monies paid by sportsmen and women provide 80% of the funding for state fish and wildlife agencies, the primary managers of our nation’s fish and wildlife resources.”

Why We Need to be Unified:

I mentioned it in my opening statement we spend way too much time and effort bashing each other.  We may not agree with each other’s methods or style, but as long as it’s legal and as long as it’s not foolishly airing distasteful content out for our enemies to exploit, then we should be supporting one another. At the least, not bashing each other. Why should we give them tinder for their fires?

When I see someone posting something distasteful, or post content that will create ill feeling towards hunters from non-hunters, I send them a direct message and let them know that they may want to rethink posting that content because it puts hunters in a bad position. I do my best not to engage in stupid debates, or get heated over social media about ignorant comments etc. I do my best. Tt doesn’t always work, and I can’t always contain my anger when I get personally attacked, but it’s in all our best interest to not engage in this type of activity. We need to try out best. Publically commenting on someone’s distasteful post isn’t helping us at all. Tt does, however, make the Facebook algorithm think the post is popular, causing the post to appear in more peoples’ news feeds, and eventually in the feed of an anti-hunter. Publically pointing out someone shortcomings or poking fun at fellow hunters doesn’t show a unified group and it doesn’t make for an environment that new hunters want to engage in.

The #Hunterup Initiative:

What’s the solution to all this negativity? The solution to the decline in hunting participation?

I would like to start an initiative to right this ship, stop fighting amongst ourselves, and most importantly, work on hunter recruitment. Hunter Recruitment and Retention is an important issue for anyone concerned about wildlife management, conservation and the future of our hunting heritage.

If 5% of us were able to bring on one new hunter a year, in 5 years we would reach hunter participation numbers we once had in the 1980’s. I challenge every hunter to recruit one at least one hunter into hunting each year, work with and foster their new interest. Help them learn to shoot, take their first animal, prep it, cook it, and enjoy it with their families. Then help them go hunt again.

I challenge those TV shows, Podcast Hosts, Bloggers, and influencers to push the #hunterup initiative. I also challenge everyone year-round to not engage in hunter on hunter hate or arguments in public forums. If you feel  strongly about a situation, respect your fellow hunter enough to contact that person directly in a private message. Take it off social media, show the world the strong unified, front of hunting.

I can already hear the whining… I know a lot of you are thinking to yourselves “I don’t want more competition in the woods”, “I already have a hard time finding a place to hunt, why do I want more people?” Sometimes it’s hard to see past our own wants and immediate needs and see the big picture. But I promise you, we will lose hunting rights and privileges if we fail to see the bigger picture. Or think about it like this, if you introduce a child into hunting, by the time he/she is an adult, it’s more than likely they won’t be direct competition for you anyway.

In the video below we discuss the benefits of taking a non-hunter and introducing them to hunting.

The inaugural launch of this initiative will be July first 2018 and each year in July we will have Hunter recruitment month with participants posting their pics and videos of their new hunting buddies with the hashtag #hunterup.

For more please go to: John Stallone

Connect With: John Stallone

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Hunting

Is an Automatic Knife a Smart or Risky EDC?

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/is-an-automatic-knife-a-smart-or-risky-edc/

Few things come in handy as often as an automatic knife, so why not carry one every day?

Carrying a knife is a great practice to get in the habit of, but to do so, you have to make sure you have the right knife.

Nowadays, automatic knives are garnering more attention than ever before, but they can pose somewhat of a risk as an everyday carry. You can’t deny the speed and convenience of an auto: one-hand is all it takes to open the knife and be fully ready to use it.

While stories have surfaced of serious accidents involving automatic knives over the years, manufacturers have prioritized safety more and more to reduce these accidents.

If you’re looking to start carrying an automatic knife, it’s always smart to do your research, even with the steady improvement of technology.

While there’s a fairly wide variety of knives that will effectively get the job done, two new models from a well-known name in the blade game deserve the spotlight.

Both of these American-made Kershaw knives stand out as safe, reliable and high-performing. Here’s why these would both make good examples of a top-notch EDC.

Kershaw Launch 1

Featuring a classic automatic look, the Launch 1 features a CPM 154 powdered metallurgy blade that opens in a hurry and stays locked. To release and close, you just push the button and fold the blade back into the handle. It’s extremely intuitive, and can be incorporated into the things you carry with you everyday with ease.

The highly durable steel blade holds a very sharp edge (thanks to a consistent distribution of carbides) for a long time and can battle against essentially all the elements. It takes on a BlackWash™ finish for a rugged look and a longer life expectancy. The blade finish helps protect the blade and helps hide common use scratches while enhancing the overall strength and performance.

Located on its lightweight, anodized-aluminum, contour-fitted handle is a low-profile push button, which greatly decreases the chances of an unintentional deploy. The Launch 1 has an ambidextrous pocket clip adjustment, meaning lefties would use their pointer finger to press the release button, instead of their thumb.

It’s an intelligently-made knife that feels familiar in the hand. If you aren’t used to carrying an automatic, it’s worth noting that the Launch 1 feels more familiar, giving you more trust in yourself each time you deploy it. It acts just like an automatic should, but without the intimidation factor.

Kershaw Launch 8

The Launch 8 is a very unique knife that dons more of an Italian stiletto look. That familiarity in the grip we just mentioned might go out the window with a unique design like this, but it’s the built-in features that still make it a smart everyday carry.

At only a featherweight 2.4 ounces, this knife weighs virtually nothing. It’s a very comfortable knife to carry, and with integrated finger guards and a low-profile button, it’s a safe one, too. That little bit of extra protection goes a long way.

Featuring a stonewashed CPM 154 powdered metallurgy steel blade, it’s tough, durable and holds a sharp edge. The pocket clip is reversible, so there’s no reason you’d have to carry the Launch 8 on the side of your non-dominant hand.

The gray, anodized-aluminum handle sports a carbon fiber insert, which covers the pivot to maintain a symmetrical look. It also helps promote a firm hold, decreasing the chances of it ever slipping.

An automatic knife doesn’t need to instantly scare people away from using it as an EDC. In fact, it could be a serious benefit for folks with arthritis or other dexterity issues. Just make sure you research the laws that govern who can own automatics and where they can be carried, but that should go without saying.

With enough practice and determined safe handling, carrying an automatic knife with you everywhere you go might be the best decision you make.

NEXT: GEAR PICKS: THE KERSHAW MULTI-TOOL

The post Is an Automatic Knife a Smart or Risky EDC? appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

on

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/is-an-automatic-knife-a-smart-or-risky-edc/

hunting

Few things come in handy as often as an automatic knife, so why not carry one every day?

Carrying a knife is a great practice to get in the habit of, but to do so, you have to make sure you have the right knife.

Nowadays, automatic knives are garnering more attention than ever before, but they can pose somewhat of a risk as an everyday carry. You can’t deny the speed and convenience of an auto: one-hand is all it takes to open the knife and be fully ready to use it.

While stories have surfaced of serious accidents involving automatic knives over the years, manufacturers have prioritized safety more and more to reduce these accidents.

If you’re looking to start carrying an automatic knife, it’s always smart to do your research, even with the steady improvement of technology.

While there’s a fairly wide variety of knives that will effectively get the job done, two new models from a well-known name in the blade game deserve the spotlight.

Both of these American-made Kershaw knives stand out as safe, reliable and high-performing. Here’s why these would both make good examples of a top-notch EDC.

Kershaw Launch 1

hunting articles

Featuring a classic automatic look, the Launch 1 features a CPM 154 powdered metallurgy blade that opens in a hurry and stays locked. To release and close, you just push the button and fold the blade back into the handle. It’s extremely intuitive, and can be incorporated into the things you carry with you everyday with ease.

The highly durable steel blade holds a very sharp edge (thanks to a consistent distribution of carbides) for a long time and can battle against essentially all the elements. It takes on a BlackWash™ finish for a rugged look and a longer life expectancy. The blade finish helps protect the blade and helps hide common use scratches while enhancing the overall strength and performance.

Located on its lightweight, anodized-aluminum, contour-fitted handle is a low-profile push button, which greatly decreases the chances of an unintentional deploy. The Launch 1 has an ambidextrous pocket clip adjustment, meaning lefties would use their pointer finger to press the release button, instead of their thumb.

It’s an intelligently-made knife that feels familiar in the hand. If you aren’t used to carrying an automatic, it’s worth noting that the Launch 1 feels more familiar, giving you more trust in yourself each time you deploy it. It acts just like an automatic should, but without the intimidation factor.

Kershaw Launch 8

hunting websites

The Launch 8 is a very unique knife that dons more of an Italian stiletto look. That familiarity in the grip we just mentioned might go out the window with a unique design like this, but it’s the built-in features that still make it a smart everyday carry.

At only a featherweight 2.4 ounces, this knife weighs virtually nothing. It’s a very comfortable knife to carry, and with integrated finger guards and a low-profile button, it’s a safe one, too. That little bit of extra protection goes a long way.

Featuring a stonewashed CPM 154 powdered metallurgy steel blade, it’s tough, durable and holds a sharp edge. The pocket clip is reversible, so there’s no reason you’d have to carry the Launch 8 on the side of your non-dominant hand.

The gray, anodized-aluminum handle sports a carbon fiber insert, which covers the pivot to maintain a symmetrical look. It also helps promote a firm hold, decreasing the chances of it ever slipping.

An automatic knife doesn’t need to instantly scare people away from using it as an EDC. In fact, it could be a serious benefit for folks with arthritis or other dexterity issues. Just make sure you research the laws that govern who can own automatics and where they can be carried, but that should go without saying.

With enough practice and determined safe handling, carrying an automatic knife with you everywhere you go might be the best decision you make.

NEXT: GEAR PICKS: THE KERSHAW MULTI-TOOL

The post Is an Automatic Knife a Smart or Risky EDC? appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Continue Reading

Hunting

Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract

Posted from: http://huntinginsider.com/christensen-arms-awarded-sc-law-enforcement-division-sled-contract/

GUNNISON, Utah – (August 21, 2019) Christensen Arms has been awarded contract number 4400021290 by the State of South Carolina to produce a version of the Christensen Arms CA-15 G2 model firearm for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED). Under the contract, Christensen Arms will provide 410 semi-automatic rifles chambered in 223 WYLDE for the division. […]

The post Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract appeared first on HuntingInsider.

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Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Published

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Posted from: http://huntinginsider.com/christensen-arms-awarded-sc-law-enforcement-division-sled-contract/

GUNNISON, Utah – (August 21, 2019) Christensen Arms has been awarded contract number 4400021290 by the State of South Carolina to produce a version of the Christensen Arms CA-15 G2 model firearm for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED). Under the contract, Christensen Arms will provide 410 semi-automatic rifles chambered in 223 WYLDE for the division. […]

The post Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract appeared first on HuntingInsider.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Hunting

What’s Better than Popeyes AND Chick-fil-a? A Fried Pheasant Sandwich

https://www.fieldandstream.com/whats-better-than-popeyes-and-chick-fil-fried-pheasant-sandwich/

Behold—the fried rooster.

Behold—the fried rooster. (Colin Kearns/)

Before we begin, let me set the record straight: The new Popeyes chicken sandwich is better than the Chick-fil-a chicken sandwich—by a country-fried mile. OK, now that we’ve got that out the way, let’s move on to an even better sandwich, the fried rooster.

There are plenty of great ways to cook pheasant—roasted, made into soup, or grilled with a beer can up the rear—but my favorite method, at least with breast meat, is with hot oil in cast iron. With the exception of maybe wild turkey, pheasant fries better than just about any game I’ve ever cooked. The meat stays tender and moist, and pairs perfectly with a salty, crunchy, golden crust. And there’s no better way to eat fried pheasant than in a sandwich.

What sets this beauty apart from a Popeyes or Chick-fil-a sandwich—aside from, you know, the improved flavor you get from honest, organic, hard-earned meat—is that it’s easy to get. The first time I tried to order the Popeyes sandwich, they were already sold out by 1 p.m. The second time, I had to wait in line for 25 minutes, which is longer than it took me to cook the fried rooster. What’s more, the pheasant sandwich brought back some great memories of flushing birds with friends behind good dogs. All I got from the Popeyes sando was a stomachache.

Here’s how to make your own fried pheasant sandwich.

Ingredients

  • 2 pheasant breasts (or wild turkey breast meat)
  • Peanut oil
  • 1 cup whole flour
  • ⅓ cup cornmeal
  • ½ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. onion powder
  • ½ tsp. cayenne powder
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Buttermilk
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hot sauce
  • Brioche bun
  • Shredded lettuce
  • Dill pickle chips

Directions

  1. <p>Preheat the oil in a cast-iron skillet to 350 degrees.</p>
  2. <p>In a large bowl, mix the flour and cornmeal with the spices. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Pour enough buttermilk into a separate bowl so the pheasant breasts can take a bath in it. Set this bowl next to the one with the seasoned flour.</p>
  3. <p>Lightly coat the pheasant breasts in the seasoned flour, then dip them into the buttermilk. Let the excess milk run off, then drop the breasts back into the seasoned flour. Make sure you coat every bit of the breasts with the seasoned flour, because this will make for a crunchier sandwich.</p>
  4. <p>Place the pheasant breasts into the skillet and fry for about 3-4 minutes, or until golden brown. Once they’re finished cooking, transfer them to a plate or cutting board and immediately season with salt.</p>
  5. <p>Meanwhile, mix a few tablespoons of mayonnaise with several dashes of hot sauce, then generously coat both the top and bottom buns with the sauce. Add a pile of shredded lettuce to the bottom bun, top it with the pheasant breasts, and add a few dill pickles. Dig in and enjoy.</p>

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
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Published

on

https://www.fieldandstream.com/whats-better-than-popeyes-and-chick-fil-fried-pheasant-sandwich/

Behold—the fried rooster.

Behold—the fried rooster. (Colin Kearns/)

Before we begin, let me set the record straight: The new Popeyes chicken sandwich is better than the Chick-fil-a chicken sandwich—by a country-fried mile. OK, now that we’ve got that out the way, let’s move on to an even better sandwich, the fried rooster.

There are plenty of great ways to cook pheasant—roasted, made into soup, or grilled with a beer can up the rear—but my favorite method, at least with breast meat, is with hot oil in cast iron. With the exception of maybe wild turkey, pheasant fries better than just about any game I’ve ever cooked. The meat stays tender and moist, and pairs perfectly with a salty, crunchy, golden crust. And there’s no better way to eat fried pheasant than in a sandwich.

What sets this beauty apart from a Popeyes or Chick-fil-a sandwich—aside from, you know, the improved flavor you get from honest, organic, hard-earned meat—is that it’s easy to get. The first time I tried to order the Popeyes sandwich, they were already sold out by 1 p.m. The second time, I had to wait in line for 25 minutes, which is longer than it took me to cook the fried rooster. What’s more, the pheasant sandwich brought back some great memories of flushing birds with friends behind good dogs. All I got from the Popeyes sando was a stomachache.

Here’s how to make your own fried pheasant sandwich.

Ingredients

  • 2 pheasant breasts (or wild turkey breast meat)
  • Peanut oil
  • 1 cup whole flour
  • ⅓ cup cornmeal
  • ½ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. onion powder
  • ½ tsp. cayenne powder
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Buttermilk
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hot sauce
  • Brioche bun
  • Shredded lettuce
  • Dill pickle chips

Directions

  1. <p>Preheat the oil in a cast-iron skillet to 350 degrees.</p>
  2. <p>In a large bowl, mix the flour and cornmeal with the spices. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Pour enough buttermilk into a separate bowl so the pheasant breasts can take a bath in it. Set this bowl next to the one with the seasoned flour.</p>
  3. <p>Lightly coat the pheasant breasts in the seasoned flour, then dip them into the buttermilk. Let the excess milk run off, then drop the breasts back into the seasoned flour. Make sure you coat every bit of the breasts with the seasoned flour, because this will make for a crunchier sandwich.</p>
  4. <p>Place the pheasant breasts into the skillet and fry for about 3-4 minutes, or until golden brown. Once they’re finished cooking, transfer them to a plate or cutting board and immediately season with salt.</p>
  5. <p>Meanwhile, mix a few tablespoons of mayonnaise with several dashes of hot sauce, then generously coat both the top and bottom buns with the sauce. Add a pile of shredded lettuce to the bottom bun, top it with the pheasant breasts, and add a few dill pickles. Dig in and enjoy.</p>

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