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Idaho’s Top Elk Units – 2019 Edition!

Posted from: https://blog.eastmans.com/idahos-top-elk-units-2019-edition/

Top LE Elk hunts

Elk hunting is a pursuit that many hunters hold sacred in their annual lineup of fall adventures, and limited entry elk hunting is a whole level up from OTC. Many apply and few are chosen, yet year after year, with odds mounting against us we apply anyway and when the scales tip in our favor all other hunts fade into the background and our priority has been set. Elk and Idaho go hand in hand. We see amazing populations in many units, marginal trophy quality when compared to B&C standards but overall reasonable drawing odds for a truly unique hunt choice. If you are after a solid bull on a hunt with lots of elk to look over, then look no further, Idaho has a bunch of those, and a few with solid trophy quality as well. Below is a list of a few top hunt choices. For more detailed information on these hunts and more be sure to subscribe to our Eastmans’ Hunting and Bowhunting Journals! Information like this and much more is all at your fingertips with hardcopy or digital additions! Eastmans.com or call us at 1-800-842-6887 for more information.

Top Any-weapon Units

Unit 30-1 – This unit is solid across the board, nothing to get excited about for trophy potential, but harvest odds and the reality of harvesting a mature bull if you draw are very good. Access is excellent, terrain is moderate to rough depending on where your travels take you. For a fun hunt with the possibility of a 300-class bull or slightly better, this is a great hunt choice.

Unit 31 – lacking slightly on the access panel, this hunt choice is a bit rough but still far from extreme. Trophy potential is standard for Idaho and harvest odds are great. Definitely a noteworthy choice.

Unit 36A-2 – This is a small unit comprised of mid-level foothill country. Terrain is pretty open, offering great glassing. There are a few roads that run through this unit and not a lot of places to get back and away from it all, 95% public land, some of the best draw odds for limited entry Idaho, and harvest stats to back it up, definitely a chart topper for a reason.

Unit 40-1 is probably one of the best for bigger bulls. With a season running in late September and into early October this is a rifle rut hunt and that is a unique opportunity. These elk herds are not bursting from the seams, but when you find bulls you are likely to see a shooter. There are only 5 permits allocated, thus nonresident permits are not likely, however, IDFG will allocate a single permit here on rotation, so keep an eye out! The terrain is varied, some areas are pretty rugged and others are medium but either way you are likely to put some miles in and be prepared for a rugged pack out. High public land and good access make this hunt choice excellent. Draw odds reflect this and are slim at best.

Top Muzzleloader Units

Units 46-1, 54 and 30A are all strong contenders. For the nonresident applicant, 30A is a solid choice. Six-point harvest is lower, but overall drawing odds and harvest odds are favorable. Muzzleloader allocations are low across the board thus nonresidents won’t see much for overall opportunity. Nonetheless, Units like 54 and 46-1 are worth it if you are willing to play the game and wait it out.

Unit 50-1 is newer to the lineup but appears to be shaping up quite nicely. This hunt is late, winter season will likely affect the results of this hunt. Draw odds are excellent, and harvest odds are very reasonable considering the weapon type. Rough terrain should help with stalking for close shots. Weather is definitely a consideration for hunts this late in the year. Either way this area is worth taking as second look.

Top Archery Units

Units 40-1, 41-1 and 46-1 are all great choices for the bow hunter. Excellent terrain for spot and stalk, reasonable spotting and great odds for harvesting a mature 6-point bull. Hunt dates are weather permitting should offer solid rut activity. There is a substantial amount of wilderness area in these units, something to consider for access.

The post Idaho’s Top Elk Units – 2019 Edition! appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
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Published

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Posted from: https://blog.eastmans.com/idahos-top-elk-units-2019-edition/

1-800-842-6887

Top LE Elk hunts

Elk hunting is a pursuit that many hunters hold sacred in their annual lineup of fall adventures, and limited entry elk hunting is a whole level up from OTC. Many apply and few are chosen, yet year after year, with odds mounting against us we apply anyway and when the scales tip in our favor all other hunts fade into the background and our priority has been set. Elk and Idaho go hand in hand. We see amazing populations in many units, marginal trophy quality when compared to B&C standards but overall reasonable drawing odds for a truly unique hunt choice. If you are after a solid bull on a hunt with lots of elk to look over, then look no further, Idaho has a bunch of those, and a few with solid trophy quality as well. Below is a list of a few top hunt choices. For more detailed information on these hunts and more be sure to subscribe to our Eastmans’ Hunting and Bowhunting Journals! Information like this and much more is all at your fingertips with hardcopy or digital additions! Eastmans.com or call us at 1-800-842-6887 for more information.

Top Any-weapon Units

Unit 30-1 – This unit is solid across the board, nothing to get excited about for trophy potential, but harvest odds and the reality of harvesting a mature bull if you draw are very good. Access is excellent, terrain is moderate to rough depending on where your travels take you. For a fun hunt with the possibility of a 300-class bull or slightly better, this is a great hunt choice.

Unit 31 – lacking slightly on the access panel, this hunt choice is a bit rough but still far from extreme. Trophy potential is standard for Idaho and harvest odds are great. Definitely a noteworthy choice.

Unit 36A-2 – This is a small unit comprised of mid-level foothill country. Terrain is pretty open, offering great glassing. There are a few roads that run through this unit and not a lot of places to get back and away from it all, 95% public land, some of the best draw odds for limited entry Idaho, and harvest stats to back it up, definitely a chart topper for a reason.

Unit 40-1 is probably one of the best for bigger bulls. With a season running in late September and into early October this is a rifle rut hunt and that is a unique opportunity. These elk herds are not bursting from the seams, but when you find bulls you are likely to see a shooter. There are only 5 permits allocated, thus nonresident permits are not likely, however, IDFG will allocate a single permit here on rotation, so keep an eye out! The terrain is varied, some areas are pretty rugged and others are medium but either way you are likely to put some miles in and be prepared for a rugged pack out. High public land and good access make this hunt choice excellent. Draw odds reflect this and are slim at best.

Top Muzzleloader Units

Units 46-1, 54 and 30A are all strong contenders. For the nonresident applicant, 30A is a solid choice. Six-point harvest is lower, but overall drawing odds and harvest odds are favorable. Muzzleloader allocations are low across the board thus nonresidents won’t see much for overall opportunity. Nonetheless, Units like 54 and 46-1 are worth it if you are willing to play the game and wait it out.

Unit 50-1 is newer to the lineup but appears to be shaping up quite nicely. This hunt is late, winter season will likely affect the results of this hunt. Draw odds are excellent, and harvest odds are very reasonable considering the weapon type. Rough terrain should help with stalking for close shots. Weather is definitely a consideration for hunts this late in the year. Either way this area is worth taking as second look.

Top Archery Units

Units 40-1, 41-1 and 46-1 are all great choices for the bow hunter. Excellent terrain for spot and stalk, reasonable spotting and great odds for harvesting a mature 6-point bull. Hunt dates are weather permitting should offer solid rut activity. There is a substantial amount of wilderness area in these units, something to consider for access.

The post Idaho’s Top Elk Units – 2019 Edition! appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Hunting

Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract

Posted from: http://huntinginsider.com/christensen-arms-awarded-sc-law-enforcement-division-sled-contract/

GUNNISON, Utah – (August 21, 2019) Christensen Arms has been awarded contract number 4400021290 by the State of South Carolina to produce a version of the Christensen Arms CA-15 G2 model firearm for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED). Under the contract, Christensen Arms will provide 410 semi-automatic rifles chambered in 223 WYLDE for the division. […]

The post Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract appeared first on HuntingInsider.

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Posted from: http://huntinginsider.com/christensen-arms-awarded-sc-law-enforcement-division-sled-contract/

GUNNISON, Utah – (August 21, 2019) Christensen Arms has been awarded contract number 4400021290 by the State of South Carolina to produce a version of the Christensen Arms CA-15 G2 model firearm for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED). Under the contract, Christensen Arms will provide 410 semi-automatic rifles chambered in 223 WYLDE for the division. […]

The post Christensen Arms® Awarded SC Law Enforcement Division (SLED) Contract appeared first on HuntingInsider.

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What’s Better than Popeyes AND Chick-fil-a? A Fried Pheasant Sandwich

https://www.fieldandstream.com/whats-better-than-popeyes-and-chick-fil-fried-pheasant-sandwich/

Behold—the fried rooster.

Behold—the fried rooster. (Colin Kearns/)

Before we begin, let me set the record straight: The new Popeyes chicken sandwich is better than the Chick-fil-a chicken sandwich—by a country-fried mile. OK, now that we’ve got that out the way, let’s move on to an even better sandwich, the fried rooster.

There are plenty of great ways to cook pheasant—roasted, made into soup, or grilled with a beer can up the rear—but my favorite method, at least with breast meat, is with hot oil in cast iron. With the exception of maybe wild turkey, pheasant fries better than just about any game I’ve ever cooked. The meat stays tender and moist, and pairs perfectly with a salty, crunchy, golden crust. And there’s no better way to eat fried pheasant than in a sandwich.

What sets this beauty apart from a Popeyes or Chick-fil-a sandwich—aside from, you know, the improved flavor you get from honest, organic, hard-earned meat—is that it’s easy to get. The first time I tried to order the Popeyes sandwich, they were already sold out by 1 p.m. The second time, I had to wait in line for 25 minutes, which is longer than it took me to cook the fried rooster. What’s more, the pheasant sandwich brought back some great memories of flushing birds with friends behind good dogs. All I got from the Popeyes sando was a stomachache.

Here’s how to make your own fried pheasant sandwich.

Ingredients

  • 2 pheasant breasts (or wild turkey breast meat)
  • Peanut oil
  • 1 cup whole flour
  • ⅓ cup cornmeal
  • ½ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. onion powder
  • ½ tsp. cayenne powder
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Buttermilk
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hot sauce
  • Brioche bun
  • Shredded lettuce
  • Dill pickle chips

Directions

  1. <p>Preheat the oil in a cast-iron skillet to 350 degrees.</p>
  2. <p>In a large bowl, mix the flour and cornmeal with the spices. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Pour enough buttermilk into a separate bowl so the pheasant breasts can take a bath in it. Set this bowl next to the one with the seasoned flour.</p>
  3. <p>Lightly coat the pheasant breasts in the seasoned flour, then dip them into the buttermilk. Let the excess milk run off, then drop the breasts back into the seasoned flour. Make sure you coat every bit of the breasts with the seasoned flour, because this will make for a crunchier sandwich.</p>
  4. <p>Place the pheasant breasts into the skillet and fry for about 3-4 minutes, or until golden brown. Once they’re finished cooking, transfer them to a plate or cutting board and immediately season with salt.</p>
  5. <p>Meanwhile, mix a few tablespoons of mayonnaise with several dashes of hot sauce, then generously coat both the top and bottom buns with the sauce. Add a pile of shredded lettuce to the bottom bun, top it with the pheasant breasts, and add a few dill pickles. Dig in and enjoy.</p>

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Published

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https://www.fieldandstream.com/whats-better-than-popeyes-and-chick-fil-fried-pheasant-sandwich/

Behold—the fried rooster.

Behold—the fried rooster. (Colin Kearns/)

Before we begin, let me set the record straight: The new Popeyes chicken sandwich is better than the Chick-fil-a chicken sandwich—by a country-fried mile. OK, now that we’ve got that out the way, let’s move on to an even better sandwich, the fried rooster.

There are plenty of great ways to cook pheasant—roasted, made into soup, or grilled with a beer can up the rear—but my favorite method, at least with breast meat, is with hot oil in cast iron. With the exception of maybe wild turkey, pheasant fries better than just about any game I’ve ever cooked. The meat stays tender and moist, and pairs perfectly with a salty, crunchy, golden crust. And there’s no better way to eat fried pheasant than in a sandwich.

What sets this beauty apart from a Popeyes or Chick-fil-a sandwich—aside from, you know, the improved flavor you get from honest, organic, hard-earned meat—is that it’s easy to get. The first time I tried to order the Popeyes sandwich, they were already sold out by 1 p.m. The second time, I had to wait in line for 25 minutes, which is longer than it took me to cook the fried rooster. What’s more, the pheasant sandwich brought back some great memories of flushing birds with friends behind good dogs. All I got from the Popeyes sando was a stomachache.

Here’s how to make your own fried pheasant sandwich.

Ingredients

  • 2 pheasant breasts (or wild turkey breast meat)
  • Peanut oil
  • 1 cup whole flour
  • ⅓ cup cornmeal
  • ½ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. onion powder
  • ½ tsp. cayenne powder
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Buttermilk
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hot sauce
  • Brioche bun
  • Shredded lettuce
  • Dill pickle chips

Directions

  1. <p>Preheat the oil in a cast-iron skillet to 350 degrees.</p>
  2. <p>In a large bowl, mix the flour and cornmeal with the spices. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Pour enough buttermilk into a separate bowl so the pheasant breasts can take a bath in it. Set this bowl next to the one with the seasoned flour.</p>
  3. <p>Lightly coat the pheasant breasts in the seasoned flour, then dip them into the buttermilk. Let the excess milk run off, then drop the breasts back into the seasoned flour. Make sure you coat every bit of the breasts with the seasoned flour, because this will make for a crunchier sandwich.</p>
  4. <p>Place the pheasant breasts into the skillet and fry for about 3-4 minutes, or until golden brown. Once they’re finished cooking, transfer them to a plate or cutting board and immediately season with salt.</p>
  5. <p>Meanwhile, mix a few tablespoons of mayonnaise with several dashes of hot sauce, then generously coat both the top and bottom buns with the sauce. Add a pile of shredded lettuce to the bottom bun, top it with the pheasant breasts, and add a few dill pickles. Dig in and enjoy.</p>

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Hunting

Ep. 294: How Deer See, Hear, Smell, and Survive with Pat Durkin

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wiredtohuntfeed/~3/k74oxK24FyM/

Today on the show I’m joined by freelance writer and whitetail hunter Pat Durkin to get back to the basics of whitetail deer and how they see, hear, smell, and survive. Subjects Discussed Pat’s whitetail and journalist history How Pat…

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http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wiredtohuntfeed/~3/k74oxK24FyM/

Today on the show I’m joined by freelance writer and whitetail hunter Pat Durkin to get back to the basics of whitetail deer and how they see, hear, smell, and survive. Subjects Discussed Pat’s whitetail and journalist history How Pat…

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

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