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The 4 Most Effective Ways to Get Rid of the Gamey Taste in Wild Meat

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/the-4-most-effective-ways-to-get-rid-of-the-gamey-taste-in-wild-meat/

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gamey taste in wild meat

If you’re struggling with the gamey taste in wild meat, start here. 

You spend a lot of time, effort and money in going about chasing down wild game for the freezer. The last thing you want in wild meat is a gamey taste when it comes time to cook it. All is not lost if the first time you tried to eat your hard-earned meal, the gamey flavor was just too overpowering to enjoy anything. Thankfully, we’ve found a few kitchen hacks when it comes to cooking venison, elk or other game animals that takes those stronger flavors right out.

A lot of people love to tell you how much they hate eating wild game meat because of the overpowering flavor. When it comes down to the facts, though, they probably never actually ate a properly field-dressed animal. On top of that, the wild game meat might not have been prepared according to traditional wild-game recipes. Game meats aren’t the same as beef. Unfortunately, many try to cook it the same way.

The following suggestions are true results from nothing but trial and error. My wife hates the gamey taste of venison. However, we’ve found a few ways around this that I’m sure will work for you, too. If you think something tastes gamey, here’s where you start to turn that around.

1. Field dressing basics

One of the biggest reasons your venison or other wild game might have a strong gamey taste starts in the field. The key to getting great-tasting game meats is to get the animal gutted and cooled as quickly as possible. The longer the animal stays in the field, overnight for example due to a bad shot, the worse it’s going to taste. Enzymes start breaking down inside the animal fairly rapidly. The warmer it is outside, the quicker this process happens. For most hunters, this is the biggest reason your meat tastes terrible.

A lot of hunters also tend to believe it’s necessary to hang and bleed an animal after it’s been gutted. However, a shot through the vitals that bleeds quite a bit is usually enough. It’s this blood that remains in the muscles that create that overpowering, gamey taste.

If you want that gamey taste out, put more emphasis on proper cleaning and getting your deer to a professional processor or your home processing station rather than hanging it.

2. Soaking it

Here’s where you’ll probably get the most advice as it pertains to wild game meat. A lot of suggestions like to recommend soaking your game meat in vinegar. Seeing as vinegar is very acidic, this technique can often dry out the meat making it very tough. Instead, soaking the meat in milk gets much better results.

For a lot of old school cooks, this is must-do step before putting any wild game meat in a slow cooker or Dutch oven. A saltwater brine is also a very popular choice. The salt helps suck a lot of the bad flavors right out. Make sure you give the meat a good clean water bath before cooking, though. Otherwise, the salt can really overpower.

Marinades are also a great way to reduce the gamey taste in wild meat. There are a variety available on the market, but something as simple as soaking it in Italian dressing can be enough. Ultimately, this helps remove more of the blood from the meat, leaving only the tissue behind. As mentioned already, that blood when it cooks is a big contributor to a strong game flavor.

3. Silver skin

Taking the time to remove the silver skin and other connective tissues before cooking will pay off dividends when it comes time to sit down and eat your meal. If you have a strong gamey taste in wild meat at your house, this very well may be the culprit, regardless of whether any of the previous strategies worked. These tissues are very strong and full of unwanted flavors. Taking the time using a small knife, or even a fork in some cases, can improve the entire cooking experience.

Removing the fat altogether is a must if people in your family have a sensitive stomach regarding wild game. In range-fed beef, the fat is a great flavor addition. In wild game, the fat doesn’t do a whole lot but make your house smell and ruin your meat.

4. Don’t overcook!

Overcooking wild game meat is a cardinal sin. The game taste in wild meat is actually amplified the more you cook it. Low and slow is the name of this game. Any pan seared venison needs only a little bit of time on both sides, but medium rare should be about all the meat is cooked at the most. Seeing as there is not a whole lot of fat, game meats cook surprisingly quick. If you’re doing all of the above and still getting a strong gamey taste, this just might be why.

Again, trial and error is a great teacher. If the gamey taste in wild meat turned you off to it years ago, perhaps it’s time to try it again. Only this time, hopefully you can keep a few of these tricks up your sleeve.

NEXT: THIS 30-MINUTE VENISON SKILLET LASAGNA WORKS ANY NIGHT OF THE WEEK

WATCH

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The post The 4 Most Effective Ways to Get Rid of the Gamey Taste in Wild Meat appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

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https://www.wideopenspaces.com/the-4-most-effective-ways-to-get-rid-of-the-gamey-taste-in-wild-meat/

nodakangler.com
gamey taste in wild meat

If you’re struggling with the gamey taste in wild meat, start here. 

You spend a lot of time, effort and money in going about chasing down wild game for the freezer. The last thing you want in wild meat is a gamey taste when it comes time to cook it. All is not lost if the first time you tried to eat your hard-earned meal, the gamey flavor was just too overpowering to enjoy anything. Thankfully, we’ve found a few kitchen hacks when it comes to cooking venison, elk or other game animals that takes those stronger flavors right out.

A lot of people love to tell you how much they hate eating wild game meat because of the overpowering flavor. When it comes down to the facts, though, they probably never actually ate a properly field-dressed animal. On top of that, the wild game meat might not have been prepared according to traditional wild-game recipes. Game meats aren’t the same as beef. Unfortunately, many try to cook it the same way.

The following suggestions are true results from nothing but trial and error. My wife hates the gamey taste of venison. However, we’ve found a few ways around this that I’m sure will work for you, too. If you think something tastes gamey, here’s where you start to turn that around.

1. Field dressing basics

One of the biggest reasons your venison or other wild game might have a strong gamey taste starts in the field. The key to getting great-tasting game meats is to get the animal gutted and cooled as quickly as possible. The longer the animal stays in the field, overnight for example due to a bad shot, the worse it’s going to taste. Enzymes start breaking down inside the animal fairly rapidly. The warmer it is outside, the quicker this process happens. For most hunters, this is the biggest reason your meat tastes terrible.

A lot of hunters also tend to believe it’s necessary to hang and bleed an animal after it’s been gutted. However, a shot through the vitals that bleeds quite a bit is usually enough. It’s this blood that remains in the muscles that create that overpowering, gamey taste.

If you want that gamey taste out, put more emphasis on proper cleaning and getting your deer to a professional processor or your home processing station rather than hanging it.

2. Soaking it

Here’s where you’ll probably get the most advice as it pertains to wild game meat. A lot of suggestions like to recommend soaking your game meat in vinegar. Seeing as vinegar is very acidic, this technique can often dry out the meat making it very tough. Instead, soaking the meat in milk gets much better results.

For a lot of old school cooks, this is must-do step before putting any wild game meat in a slow cooker or Dutch oven. A saltwater brine is also a very popular choice. The salt helps suck a lot of the bad flavors right out. Make sure you give the meat a good clean water bath before cooking, though. Otherwise, the salt can really overpower.

Marinades are also a great way to reduce the gamey taste in wild meat. There are a variety available on the market, but something as simple as soaking it in Italian dressing can be enough. Ultimately, this helps remove more of the blood from the meat, leaving only the tissue behind. As mentioned already, that blood when it cooks is a big contributor to a strong game flavor.

3. Silver skin

Taking the time to remove the silver skin and other connective tissues before cooking will pay off dividends when it comes time to sit down and eat your meal. If you have a strong gamey taste in wild meat at your house, this very well may be the culprit, regardless of whether any of the previous strategies worked. These tissues are very strong and full of unwanted flavors. Taking the time using a small knife, or even a fork in some cases, can improve the entire cooking experience.

Removing the fat altogether is a must if people in your family have a sensitive stomach regarding wild game. In range-fed beef, the fat is a great flavor addition. In wild game, the fat doesn’t do a whole lot but make your house smell and ruin your meat.

4. Don’t overcook!

Overcooking wild game meat is a cardinal sin. The game taste in wild meat is actually amplified the more you cook it. Low and slow is the name of this game. Any pan seared venison needs only a little bit of time on both sides, but medium rare should be about all the meat is cooked at the most. Seeing as there is not a whole lot of fat, game meats cook surprisingly quick. If you’re doing all of the above and still getting a strong gamey taste, this just might be why.

Again, trial and error is a great teacher. If the gamey taste in wild meat turned you off to it years ago, perhaps it’s time to try it again. Only this time, hopefully you can keep a few of these tricks up your sleeve.

NEXT: THIS 30-MINUTE VENISON SKILLET LASAGNA WORKS ANY NIGHT OF THE WEEK

WATCH

oembed rumble video here

The post The 4 Most Effective Ways to Get Rid of the Gamey Taste in Wild Meat appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

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Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

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Hunting

How To Bowhunt Elk Right

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2018/10/how-to-bowhunt-elk-right/

10 Tips For Bow Hunting Elk

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

10 Tips for Bowhunting Elk

Whether you’re hunting with longbow, recurve, compound or crossbow, bowhunting elk can be the most exciting hunts you’ll ever experience. It can also be incredibly slow and actionless. Here are ten tips that will help make your fall elk hunt a great one.

1. Get in Shape
You’ve heard it before, but it bears repeating: Be in the best shape you can before your elk hunt. There are not many experiences as disheartening as watching a big bull and his harem pass just out of bow range because you were too winded to get into position. Focus on three areas: cardio, legs and weight bearing. Cardio so you can charge up those high-elevation hills when the moment of truth arrives; legs for the same reason; weight bearing because you’ll almost always have a pack on your shoulders—a heavy one if you take an elk.

2. Practice
Work with your chosen archery equipment until you’re comfortable shooting from your knees, under branches and over brush. Practice shooting steeply uphill and downhill; stretch your range as far as you ethically can. Shots can be long, steep and challenging in elk country, and the better prepared you are to make a tough shot the more likely you are to make meat.

3. Be Bivy Ready
One of the most effective tactics in my toolbox is to sleep on the mountain with the elk. Get a super-light bivy camping setup and learn how to use it. That way, you’ll have your camp on your back and be ready to spend the night wherever the elk take you. Make camp a few hundred yards downwind of the elk, moving with them at night if necessary, and make your stalk in the grey light of dawn. Elk expect you to be hiking up the trail that time of day, not in their bedroom.

4. Find Elk
The hardest part about elk hunting is often finding the elk. Employ three senses for this: hearing, sight and smell, in that order. Spend lots of time on ridge tops and vantage points listening for a distant bugle or a cow chirp. Scan distant hillsides with your binoculars while you listen. You can blow locating bugles to inspire elk to be vocal. Send a bugle, wait and listen for two minutes, then send another. After that, wait 15 minutes and try again. In areas with a lot of pressure from hunters or wolves, you may need to do this at night (don’t hunt at night, just locate), and pay attention to the wind. I’ve often found elk by their sweet barnyard odor drifting on the breeze.

5. Hunt Hidey-Holes
Elk don’t like pressure. If bothered by hunters or wolves they will dive into the nastiest, thickest, steepest places they can find. A bit of feed, a little water and a lot of security cover is all they need. If elk are scarce, start looking for gosh-awful nasty hidey-holes that other hunters are reluctant to venture into; you’ll have the elk all to yourself.

6. Sound Like an Elk
Nowadays elk have heard it all, and are rather adept at picking out a fake—especially the suspicious old matriarchs of the herd. The slightest mistake, and the elk you worked so hard to find will be headed for Canada. To circumvent this you need to call sparingly, and sound like a herd of elk. Snap twigs, rustle brush, and knock a stick against a deadfall log to sound like a hoof hitting. Rub a tree a little to sound like an aggressive bull. When you blow a cow call, only call one time. Often the first call will get the elk’s attention, the second will relay that you’re a fake. Wait a few minutes before calling again.

7. Tag-Team Bulls
The exception to the above advice is a testosterone-charged bull. If you find a bull that bugles immediately and hard in response to your cow calls, call back often and seductively. The best setup is done with two hunters, one working the calls, moving back and forth, snapping twigs and deploying a decoy if he’s got one. He can even move away, calling as he goes, if the bull hangs up out of range. The second hunter sets up 40 to 100 yards in front, on the downwind side of where he expects the bull to come through. This hunter should never call except to signal his partner that he’s in position or that he’s taken a shot. That way the bull’s attention is on the caller, and with luck he’ll walk right by the hunter, offering a close, clean shot opportunity.

8. Set Up in Front
One of the most common mistakes rooky elk hunters make is to set up with plenty of cover between them and where they expect the elk to show up. Leave your whitetail skills at home on this one, and set up with cover behind you to break up your outline, but only minimal cover in front. Compared to whitetails, elk can be pretty oblivious. Paint your face and hands, kneel on the ground with your bow at the ready, and hold still; elk will walk right by and never spot you.

9. Hunt Midday
Elk are very aware that most hunters head back to camp for lunch and a nap. They relax a bit, browse around and get a drink if one is handy. Bulls are often tired from rutting all night, but after a nice late-morning nap feel the urge to initiate a little action. It’s one of the best times to call a herd bull away from his harem. One of my favorite strategies is to set up downwind of a favored wallow and waterhole. If elk are nearby it’s only a matter of time till one shows up for a drink—and chances are good it’ll be the herd bull.

10. Be Aggressive
Timid hunters don’t kill many elk. Don’t hesitate to make an aggressive move if necessary. Move quickly to adjust your setup or cut off a herd. As a last-ditch effort, you can charge right into the herd. They’ll often mill in surprise for a few seconds, giving you a chance to arrow one of them. Once they bust and run, you can run after them for a minute, then call frantically like a lost cow—the herd bull just may turn around and come back for you. Another brazen tactic that can pay off big is moving in fast on a rubbing bull. If a bull is actively rubbing his antlers on a tree, his eyes are mostly shut. I’ve walked right up to within single-digit yards of bulls preoccupied with venting their frustrations on a tree. You can do the same; just close the distance fast, draw your bow and put a steady shot into his vitals. It’ll be your most exciting bowhunting experience ever.

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2018/10/how-to-bowhunt-elk-right/

10 Tips For Bow Hunting Elk

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

10 Tips for Bowhunting Elk

Whether you’re hunting with longbow, recurve, compound or crossbow, bowhunting elk can be the most exciting hunts you’ll ever experience. It can also be incredibly slow and actionless. Here are ten tips that will help make your fall elk hunt a great one.

1. Get in Shape
You’ve heard it before, but it bears repeating: Be in the best shape you can before your elk hunt. There are not many experiences as disheartening as watching a big bull and his harem pass just out of bow range because you were too winded to get into position. Focus on three areas: cardio, legs and weight bearing. Cardio so you can charge up those high-elevation hills when the moment of truth arrives; legs for the same reason; weight bearing because you’ll almost always have a pack on your shoulders—a heavy one if you take an elk.

2. Practice
Work with your chosen archery equipment until you’re comfortable shooting from your knees, under branches and over brush. Practice shooting steeply uphill and downhill; stretch your range as far as you ethically can. Shots can be long, steep and challenging in elk country, and the better prepared you are to make a tough shot the more likely you are to make meat.

3. Be Bivy Ready
One of the most effective tactics in my toolbox is to sleep on the mountain with the elk. Get a super-light bivy camping setup and learn how to use it. That way, you’ll have your camp on your back and be ready to spend the night wherever the elk take you. Make camp a few hundred yards downwind of the elk, moving with them at night if necessary, and make your stalk in the grey light of dawn. Elk expect you to be hiking up the trail that time of day, not in their bedroom.

4. Find Elk
The hardest part about elk hunting is often finding the elk. Employ three senses for this: hearing, sight and smell, in that order. Spend lots of time on ridge tops and vantage points listening for a distant bugle or a cow chirp. Scan distant hillsides with your binoculars while you listen. You can blow locating bugles to inspire elk to be vocal. Send a bugle, wait and listen for two minutes, then send another. After that, wait 15 minutes and try again. In areas with a lot of pressure from hunters or wolves, you may need to do this at night (don’t hunt at night, just locate), and pay attention to the wind. I’ve often found elk by their sweet barnyard odor drifting on the breeze.

5. Hunt Hidey-Holes
Elk don’t like pressure. If bothered by hunters or wolves they will dive into the nastiest, thickest, steepest places they can find. A bit of feed, a little water and a lot of security cover is all they need. If elk are scarce, start looking for gosh-awful nasty hidey-holes that other hunters are reluctant to venture into; you’ll have the elk all to yourself.

6. Sound Like an Elk
Nowadays elk have heard it all, and are rather adept at picking out a fake—especially the suspicious old matriarchs of the herd. The slightest mistake, and the elk you worked so hard to find will be headed for Canada. To circumvent this you need to call sparingly, and sound like a herd of elk. Snap twigs, rustle brush, and knock a stick against a deadfall log to sound like a hoof hitting. Rub a tree a little to sound like an aggressive bull. When you blow a cow call, only call one time. Often the first call will get the elk’s attention, the second will relay that you’re a fake. Wait a few minutes before calling again.

7. Tag-Team Bulls
The exception to the above advice is a testosterone-charged bull. If you find a bull that bugles immediately and hard in response to your cow calls, call back often and seductively. The best setup is done with two hunters, one working the calls, moving back and forth, snapping twigs and deploying a decoy if he’s got one. He can even move away, calling as he goes, if the bull hangs up out of range. The second hunter sets up 40 to 100 yards in front, on the downwind side of where he expects the bull to come through. This hunter should never call except to signal his partner that he’s in position or that he’s taken a shot. That way the bull’s attention is on the caller, and with luck he’ll walk right by the hunter, offering a close, clean shot opportunity.

8. Set Up in Front
One of the most common mistakes rooky elk hunters make is to set up with plenty of cover between them and where they expect the elk to show up. Leave your whitetail skills at home on this one, and set up with cover behind you to break up your outline, but only minimal cover in front. Compared to whitetails, elk can be pretty oblivious. Paint your face and hands, kneel on the ground with your bow at the ready, and hold still; elk will walk right by and never spot you.

9. Hunt Midday
Elk are very aware that most hunters head back to camp for lunch and a nap. They relax a bit, browse around and get a drink if one is handy. Bulls are often tired from rutting all night, but after a nice late-morning nap feel the urge to initiate a little action. It’s one of the best times to call a herd bull away from his harem. One of my favorite strategies is to set up downwind of a favored wallow and waterhole. If elk are nearby it’s only a matter of time till one shows up for a drink—and chances are good it’ll be the herd bull.

10. Be Aggressive
Timid hunters don’t kill many elk. Don’t hesitate to make an aggressive move if necessary. Move quickly to adjust your setup or cut off a herd. As a last-ditch effort, you can charge right into the herd. They’ll often mill in surprise for a few seconds, giving you a chance to arrow one of them. Once they bust and run, you can run after them for a minute, then call frantically like a lost cow—the herd bull just may turn around and come back for you. Another brazen tactic that can pay off big is moving in fast on a rubbing bull. If a bull is actively rubbing his antlers on a tree, his eyes are mostly shut. I’ve walked right up to within single-digit yards of bulls preoccupied with venting their frustrations on a tree. You can do the same; just close the distance fast, draw your bow and put a steady shot into his vitals. It’ll be your most exciting bowhunting experience ever.

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Hunting

Calling Deer: Is It Too Early to Rattle?

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2018/10/18/calling-deer-is-it-too-early-to-rattle/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=calling-deer-is-it-too-early-to-rattle

Is mid-October too early to rattle up a buck? Calling deer is all about timing and real estate at this time of year. Here’s what you need to… Read more…

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Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2018/10/18/calling-deer-is-it-too-early-to-rattle/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=calling-deer-is-it-too-early-to-rattle

Is mid-October too early to rattle up a buck? Calling deer is all about timing and real estate at this time of year. Here’s what you need to… Read more…

The post Calling Deer: Is It Too Early to Rattle? appeared first on Bowhunting.com.

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Hunting

TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver Review

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2018/10/18/tightspot-7-arrow-quiver/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tightspot-7-arrow-quiver

Take a look at one of the best arrow quivers in the business in our TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver review, including photos, specs, and video…. Read more…

The post TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver Review appeared first on Bowhunting.com.

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Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2018/10/18/tightspot-7-arrow-quiver/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tightspot-7-arrow-quiver

Take a look at one of the best arrow quivers in the business in our TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver review, including photos, specs, and video…. Read more…

The post TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver Review appeared first on Bowhunting.com.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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