Connect with us

Hunting

The Great Big Oklahoma Deer Hunting Guide

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/the-great-big-oklahoma-deer-hunting-guide/

YouTube/Brush Country Monsters
Oklahoma Deer Hunting

Here’s your guide to deer hunting in Oklahoma.

Planning deer hunting trip to the Sooner State this fall? Whether you’re after whitetail deer or muleys with archery gear or a rifle, we’re here to help.

We’ll go over purchasing your hunting licenses, good hunting areas and more.

This is everything you need to know to bag a big buck in Oklahoma this year.

Oklahoma Deer Hunting Licenses

Unlike many other states, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation keeps things incredibly simple when it comes to licenses. You can buy them either online or over-the-counter. Note that you will get charged a $3 “convenience fee” if you buy online.

The good news is, if you’re a resident, license fees are very affordable. Resident archery, antlered and antlerless muzzleloader and gun tags are all just $20. For youth hunters, the cost is just $10. You must also have an annual hunting license at a cost of $25.

For non-residents, you will need a standard hunting license. Oklahoma sells an annual, fiscal-year and 5-day license, so you have a choice depending on the length of your hunt. The cost breakdown for those licenses in order is $142, $176 and $75.

Once you have that, you can purchase a deer archery, deer muzzleloader or deer gun tags for $300. For youth hunters the costs are little bit less. An archery, muzzleloader and gun non-resident youth tag cost $100.

Non-resident youth hunters also have the option to purchase antlerless muzzleloader and gun tags for $31.

Oklahoma Deer Season Dates

Here are all the season dates for 2019 you will need to know in order to best plan your hunt this year.

Archery Season – October 1-January 15

Youth Deer Gun – October 18-20

Muzzleloader – October 26-November 3

Gun Season – November 23-December 8

Holiday Antlerless – December 20-29

If there is one thing we can say about Oklahoma, it’s that they keep their deer seasons and license systems very straightforward and simple. We can appreciate that.

What to bring

Oklahoma is a trophy buck state for whitetail hunting. Its location in the middle of the U.S. works in its favor for hunters.

You won’t be dealing with weather conditions that are too extreme. It generally only gets around 30 degrees at the coldest in the heart of winter from December through January, so super-heavy hunting clothing isn’t really a necessity. If you’re hunting in the early season, remember to get your deer on ice, cut up or to a processor as quickly as you can to avoid spoilage. The Sooner State can still see some 70-80 degree days well into October!

The rut generally peaks in Oklahoma sometime in mid-November. If you’re going to be visiting at that time, it’s not a bad idea to have a grunt call and rattling antlers handy. Fortunately, Oklahoma is loaded with big deer, which means many are ready and willing to respond to aggressive calling and rattling sequences if you time it right.

As far as method of take goes, Oklahoma is pretty wide open when it comes to options. Compounds, recurves and longbows are all fine but must have a draw weight of 30 pounds minimum. Crossbows have to have bolts at least 14 inches long with a 100 pound draw weight.

For firearms, you can use shotguns firing slugs, handguns with at least a 55-grain weight and four-inch barrel and centerfire rifles with a 55-grain weight. You can even use suppressors if you want. Muzzleloaders must be .40 caliber or larger for a rifle or pistol and 20-gauge or larger for a muzzleloading shotgun.

Another thing to keep in mind is that some parts of Oklahoma are flat and wide open. Sometimes trees for stands might be limited, especially in the western part of the state, which tends to be a lot of open plains. It’s not a bad idea to have a pop-up ground blind that you can quickly set up if you just can’t find a suitable tree for where the deer are moving.

Where to hunt deer in Oklahoma

Oklahoma is generally considered one of the top deer hunting states in the country. The bad news is, finding a place to hunt can be a real challenge.

For public hunting opportunities, check out the Osage Wildlife Management Area. The good news? It’s approximately 9,500 acres of public hunting opportunity for deer hunters. The bad news? Osage is one of the most popular counties to hunt in the state and it often leads the way in number of harvests.

While that last part could be considered a good thing, it also means you’ll likely run into some hunting pressure.

The middle and eastern parts of the state tends to lead the way in number and size of harvests. The east has produced monsters like Micalah Millard’s 179 7/8-inch McIntosh County buck. In the central part of the state, two years ago, Pontotoc County hunter Larry Wheeler lived a hunter’s dream come true. Wheeler shot a 206 4/8-inch 25 pointer in a pecan grove one week, and then shot a 202 1/8-inch 34-pointer the following week in the same place!

But really, any area of Oklahoma is good for trophy bucks. In 2017, U.S. Army Sergeant Travis Ocker shot a 28-pointer scoring 245 2/8 while stationed at Fort Sill in Comanche County. For the nearest public hunting to where that beast was shot, look at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Note that because it is a federally-owned area, you do have to apply for a draw to hunt there.

Another central public hunting option is the Lexington Wildlife Management Area south of Oklahoma City. It has a lot of deer, but there is a good amount of hunting pressure to deal with. In the eastern part of the state, check out the portion of the Ouachita National Forest that spills over the Arkansas border into Oklahoma.

Beyond National Forests and Wildlife Management Areas, there are other options. Check out the Oklahoma Land Access program (OLAP), which incentivizes landowners to open their land to public hunting. Most of these areas are in the western part of the state.

Just remember that the landowners completely control access, and they can shut it off at any time they desire. Have a back-up plan if you’re planning to hunt one of these areas from out of state.

If all else fails and you can’t find an area of public land you like, you might have to “pay to play,” so to speak. There is no shortage of Oklahoma outfitters scattered across the state that will guide you and give you access to great private land, for a fee of course. Hunts are often either guided or semi-guided, and run anywhere from $2,000-5,000.

A great place to take a trophy

If you’re looking for a true monster whitetail buck, you really can’t go wrong with hunting Oklahoma. Every hunting season, multiple Boone and Crockett class deer fall in the Sooner State and plenty of others escape to grow another year. Maybe this year you’ll be the next lucky hunter to down an Oklahoma monster!

For more outdoor content from Travis Smola, be sure to follow him on Twitter and check out his Geocaching and Outdoors with Travis Youtube channels

NEXT: AN OUTSIDER’S LOOK AT MICHIGAN DEER HUNTING

WATCH

oembed rumble video here

The post The Great Big Oklahoma Deer Hunting Guide appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

on

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/the-great-big-oklahoma-deer-hunting-guide/

YouTube/Brush Country Monsters
Oklahoma Deer Hunting

Here’s your guide to deer hunting in Oklahoma.

Planning deer hunting trip to the Sooner State this fall? Whether you’re after whitetail deer or muleys with archery gear or a rifle, we’re here to help.

We’ll go over purchasing your hunting licenses, good hunting areas and more.

This is everything you need to know to bag a big buck in Oklahoma this year.

Oklahoma Deer Hunting Licenses

Unlike many other states, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation keeps things incredibly simple when it comes to licenses. You can buy them either online or over-the-counter. Note that you will get charged a $3 “convenience fee” if you buy online.

The good news is, if you’re a resident, license fees are very affordable. Resident archery, antlered and antlerless muzzleloader and gun tags are all just $20. For youth hunters, the cost is just $10. You must also have an annual hunting license at a cost of $25.

For non-residents, you will need a standard hunting license. Oklahoma sells an annual, fiscal-year and 5-day license, so you have a choice depending on the length of your hunt. The cost breakdown for those licenses in order is $142, $176 and $75.

Once you have that, you can purchase a deer archery, deer muzzleloader or deer gun tags for $300. For youth hunters the costs are little bit less. An archery, muzzleloader and gun non-resident youth tag cost $100.

Non-resident youth hunters also have the option to purchase antlerless muzzleloader and gun tags for $31.

Oklahoma Deer Season Dates

Here are all the season dates for 2019 you will need to know in order to best plan your hunt this year.

Archery Season – October 1-January 15

Youth Deer Gun – October 18-20

Muzzleloader – October 26-November 3

Gun Season – November 23-December 8

Holiday Antlerless – December 20-29

If there is one thing we can say about Oklahoma, it’s that they keep their deer seasons and license systems very straightforward and simple. We can appreciate that.

What to bring

Oklahoma is a trophy buck state for whitetail hunting. Its location in the middle of the U.S. works in its favor for hunters.

You won’t be dealing with weather conditions that are too extreme. It generally only gets around 30 degrees at the coldest in the heart of winter from December through January, so super-heavy hunting clothing isn’t really a necessity. If you’re hunting in the early season, remember to get your deer on ice, cut up or to a processor as quickly as you can to avoid spoilage. The Sooner State can still see some 70-80 degree days well into October!

The rut generally peaks in Oklahoma sometime in mid-November. If you’re going to be visiting at that time, it’s not a bad idea to have a grunt call and rattling antlers handy. Fortunately, Oklahoma is loaded with big deer, which means many are ready and willing to respond to aggressive calling and rattling sequences if you time it right.

As far as method of take goes, Oklahoma is pretty wide open when it comes to options. Compounds, recurves and longbows are all fine but must have a draw weight of 30 pounds minimum. Crossbows have to have bolts at least 14 inches long with a 100 pound draw weight.

For firearms, you can use shotguns firing slugs, handguns with at least a 55-grain weight and four-inch barrel and centerfire rifles with a 55-grain weight. You can even use suppressors if you want. Muzzleloaders must be .40 caliber or larger for a rifle or pistol and 20-gauge or larger for a muzzleloading shotgun.

Another thing to keep in mind is that some parts of Oklahoma are flat and wide open. Sometimes trees for stands might be limited, especially in the western part of the state, which tends to be a lot of open plains. It’s not a bad idea to have a pop-up ground blind that you can quickly set up if you just can’t find a suitable tree for where the deer are moving.

Where to hunt deer in Oklahoma

Oklahoma is generally considered one of the top deer hunting states in the country. The bad news is, finding a place to hunt can be a real challenge.

For public hunting opportunities, check out the Osage Wildlife Management Area. The good news? It’s approximately 9,500 acres of public hunting opportunity for deer hunters. The bad news? Osage is one of the most popular counties to hunt in the state and it often leads the way in number of harvests.

While that last part could be considered a good thing, it also means you’ll likely run into some hunting pressure.

The middle and eastern parts of the state tends to lead the way in number and size of harvests. The east has produced monsters like Micalah Millard’s 179 7/8-inch McIntosh County buck. In the central part of the state, two years ago, Pontotoc County hunter Larry Wheeler lived a hunter’s dream come true. Wheeler shot a 206 4/8-inch 25 pointer in a pecan grove one week, and then shot a 202 1/8-inch 34-pointer the following week in the same place!

But really, any area of Oklahoma is good for trophy bucks. In 2017, U.S. Army Sergeant Travis Ocker shot a 28-pointer scoring 245 2/8 while stationed at Fort Sill in Comanche County. For the nearest public hunting to where that beast was shot, look at the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Note that because it is a federally-owned area, you do have to apply for a draw to hunt there.

Another central public hunting option is the Lexington Wildlife Management Area south of Oklahoma City. It has a lot of deer, but there is a good amount of hunting pressure to deal with. In the eastern part of the state, check out the portion of the Ouachita National Forest that spills over the Arkansas border into Oklahoma.

Beyond National Forests and Wildlife Management Areas, there are other options. Check out the Oklahoma Land Access program (OLAP), which incentivizes landowners to open their land to public hunting. Most of these areas are in the western part of the state.

Just remember that the landowners completely control access, and they can shut it off at any time they desire. Have a back-up plan if you’re planning to hunt one of these areas from out of state.

If all else fails and you can’t find an area of public land you like, you might have to “pay to play,” so to speak. There is no shortage of Oklahoma outfitters scattered across the state that will guide you and give you access to great private land, for a fee of course. Hunts are often either guided or semi-guided, and run anywhere from $2,000-5,000.

A great place to take a trophy

If you’re looking for a true monster whitetail buck, you really can’t go wrong with hunting Oklahoma. Every hunting season, multiple Boone and Crockett class deer fall in the Sooner State and plenty of others escape to grow another year. Maybe this year you’ll be the next lucky hunter to down an Oklahoma monster!

For more outdoor content from Travis Smola, be sure to follow him on Twitter and check out his Geocaching and Outdoors with Travis Youtube channels

NEXT: AN OUTSIDER’S LOOK AT MICHIGAN DEER HUNTING

WATCH

oembed rumble video here

The post The Great Big Oklahoma Deer Hunting Guide appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Hunting

Destination Whitetail: This is Buckeye Country

https://www.deeranddeerhunting.com/articles/tv-shows/destination-whitetail/destination-whitetail-this-is-buckeye-country

Destination Whitetail: This is Buckeye Country

DDH is in Ohio chasing the bucks that this Midwestern state is becoming well known for.

The post Destination Whitetail: This is Buckeye Country appeared first on .

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

on

https://www.deeranddeerhunting.com/articles/tv-shows/destination-whitetail/destination-whitetail-this-is-buckeye-country

Destination Whitetail: This is Buckeye Country

DDH is in Ohio chasing the bucks that this Midwestern state is becoming well known for.

The post Destination Whitetail: This is Buckeye Country appeared first on .

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Continue Reading

Hunting

Why You Should Plant a Food Plot

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2019/07/22/why-you-should-plant-a-food-plot/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-you-should-plant-a-food-plot

Are you on the fence about adding food plots to your hunting properties? Here’s a look at why you should plant a food plot…. Read more…

The post Why You Should Plant a Food Plot appeared first on Bowhunting.com.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Published

on

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2019/07/22/why-you-should-plant-a-food-plot/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-you-should-plant-a-food-plot

Are you on the fence about adding food plots to your hunting properties? Here’s a look at why you should plant a food plot…. Read more…

The post Why You Should Plant a Food Plot appeared first on Bowhunting.com.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Continue Reading

Hunting

Winter Deer Management: Shed Antlers, Food, Cover, Trapping (#481) @GrowingDeer.tv

Posted from: http://youtu.be/RRNWMJdY6vo

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Published

on

Posted from: http://youtu.be/RRNWMJdY6vo

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 FreaknHunting.com

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!