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#WhitetailWednesday: 8 of the Strangest Deer Deformities Ever

http://www.wideopenspaces.com/whitetailwednesday-8-of-the-strangest-deer-deformities-ever/

Deer Deformities

From two-headed fawns to extra limbs, this #WhitetailWednesday is about to get really weird.

Like any animal, whitetail deer are sometimes subject to nature’s cruelty. As a result, they can end up with some really strange deformities that can make life miserable.

For today’s #WhitetailWednesday, here are 8 of the strangest deformities to have hit the net in recent years.

Underbite/Stunted Nose

Deer Deformities
Missouri Whitetails

A few photos of bucks like this have been making the rounds for a while. People have suggested everything from injuries, to bad genetic traits or down syndrome to be the cause. There are other strange bone structure deformities similar to this that circulate the net, too, some having curved or even crooked nasal structures.

Whatever the case may be, it couldn’t have been easy for this buck to eat. It’s probably merciful that a deer hunter was able to take him.

Antlered Doe

Wbay.com

A few of these female deer seem to pop up every hunting season. Many times the hunters in the area have no idea the animal is a doe until they flip it over to field dress it!

Such was the case with this 222-pound antlered doe taken by Wisconsin hunter Wayne Douville in 2016. Antlered does are usually caused when testosterone levels are higher than normal in a female deer. These deer often have abnormal antler growth, but as we saw in the Douville doe, they can also grow a very normal set of antlers any hunter would be proud to put on their wall.

Deer Warts

Deer Deformities
Facebook

If there is one deformity we’d be glad to go our whole lives without seeing, it’s warts on a deer. Warts, officially known as cutaneous fibromas, usually happen as a result of cuts or wounds. They can also result from common parasites like biting flies or mosquitoes. In any case, bucks are more likely to get them as a result of fighting.

The internet is full of photos of deer absolutely covered in disgusting warts, so it’s more common than you might expect. Wildlife biologists say the meat not covered in warts is safe for human consumption, but we’d still be a little bit hesitant. Sadly, these growths often happen on a deer’s face near their mouth and nose, making life difficult.

Two-Headed Fawn

This stillborn fawn was found in southeastern Minnesota a few years ago and has had biologists scratching their heads ever since. Discovered by a mushroom hunter, the doe chewed through the umbilical cord and licked the fawn clean before she realized it was dead.

An MRI revealed it had two hearts, but shared a liver and lungs. Since this kind of thing does happen occasionally in cattle, scientists speculate it probably happens often in deer populations, but the young deer likely don’t survive long.

It was very lucky that the mushroom hunter was in the right place at the right time to recover this rare find.

Extra Legs

Deer Deformities
Facebook

This kind of deformity is quite rare, but it does happen on occasion. The Quality Deer Management Association says deer with extra limbs coming out of their backs or other areas are likely carrying around a parasitic twin. The deer likely started out as twin embryos in the womb.

But when the embryos don’t separate, sometimes you get a deer with an extra limb or two. The good news is while you get a really weird-looking deer with this deformity, it usually doesn’t prevent the animal from living a healthy life.

‘Sleigh Hoof’

Deer Deformities
QDMA

This uncommon deformity is often seen in cattle and even in other deer species, such as moose. However, it’s also seen in whitetails, and it definitely makes for a strange sight when a deer’s hooves grow disproportionately long.

Experts believe this type of deformity is caused by mineral imbalances. The buck in the photo above likely spent too much time eating high-carbohydrate foods at bait piles or deer-feeding stations. It looks painful, but it certainly didn’t stop the buck from growing a big rack.

‘Bullwinkle’ Syndrome

Deer Deformities
Facebook

A few photos of whitetail deer suffering with this rare condition have been making their way to the web in recent years. Obviously, the name comes from the cartoon moose, “Bullwinkle.”. This is what happens when a deer sufferers from a long-term bacterial inflammations in their mouth, nose or lips. These deformities are fairly new phenomenon and the QDMA recommends reporting them to your state wildlife agencies as soon as you see or shoot one.

Because of the bacterial nature of this deformity, scientists have advised against these deer for human consumption. Still, we think we’d have to pull the trigger anyway, if for no other reason than to put the animal out of its misery. This type of thing looks incredibly painful, but fortunately, this condition is extremely rare.

‘Cactus’ Racks

Deer Deformities
Facebook

This deformity is often the result of a buck who manages to injure his genitalia or has some other type of hormonal imbalance. It seems like several of these bucks are shot every year and it results in some of the most abnormal antlers ever seen by deer hunters. In many cases, the bucks don’t even shed the antlers, they just keep growing. Sometimes does grow these cactus racks, too.

Some of these “cactus” racks have actually resulted in some absolutely massive non-typical deer. But current Boone and Crockett and Pope and Young scoring systems don’t accept these deer into their record books. In fact, the clubs have declared more than one deer like this as “unscoreable” due to the freak nature of the antlers.

NEXT: #WHITETAILWEDNESDAY: 25 UNIQUE IDEAS FOR YOUR NEXT WHITETAIL MOUNT

WATCH

The post #WhitetailWednesday: 8 of the Strangest Deer Deformities Ever appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

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http://www.wideopenspaces.com/whitetailwednesday-8-of-the-strangest-deer-deformities-ever/

Deer Deformities

From two-headed fawns to extra limbs, this #WhitetailWednesday is about to get really weird.

Like any animal, whitetail deer are sometimes subject to nature’s cruelty. As a result, they can end up with some really strange deformities that can make life miserable.

For today’s #WhitetailWednesday, here are 8 of the strangest deformities to have hit the net in recent years.

Underbite/Stunted Nose

Deer Deformities
Missouri Whitetails

A few photos of bucks like this have been making the rounds for a while. People have suggested everything from injuries, to bad genetic traits or down syndrome to be the cause. There are other strange bone structure deformities similar to this that circulate the net, too, some having curved or even crooked nasal structures.

Whatever the case may be, it couldn’t have been easy for this buck to eat. It’s probably merciful that a deer hunter was able to take him.

Antlered Doe

Wbay.com

A few of these female deer seem to pop up every hunting season. Many times the hunters in the area have no idea the animal is a doe until they flip it over to field dress it!

Such was the case with this 222-pound antlered doe taken by Wisconsin hunter Wayne Douville in 2016. Antlered does are usually caused when testosterone levels are higher than normal in a female deer. These deer often have abnormal antler growth, but as we saw in the Douville doe, they can also grow a very normal set of antlers any hunter would be proud to put on their wall.

Deer Warts

Deer Deformities
Facebook

If there is one deformity we’d be glad to go our whole lives without seeing, it’s warts on a deer. Warts, officially known as cutaneous fibromas, usually happen as a result of cuts or wounds. They can also result from common parasites like biting flies or mosquitoes. In any case, bucks are more likely to get them as a result of fighting.

The internet is full of photos of deer absolutely covered in disgusting warts, so it’s more common than you might expect. Wildlife biologists say the meat not covered in warts is safe for human consumption, but we’d still be a little bit hesitant. Sadly, these growths often happen on a deer’s face near their mouth and nose, making life difficult.

Two-Headed Fawn

This stillborn fawn was found in southeastern Minnesota a few years ago and has had biologists scratching their heads ever since. Discovered by a mushroom hunter, the doe chewed through the umbilical cord and licked the fawn clean before she realized it was dead.

An MRI revealed it had two hearts, but shared a liver and lungs. Since this kind of thing does happen occasionally in cattle, scientists speculate it probably happens often in deer populations, but the young deer likely don’t survive long.

It was very lucky that the mushroom hunter was in the right place at the right time to recover this rare find.

Extra Legs

Deer Deformities
Facebook

This kind of deformity is quite rare, but it does happen on occasion. The Quality Deer Management Association says deer with extra limbs coming out of their backs or other areas are likely carrying around a parasitic twin. The deer likely started out as twin embryos in the womb.

But when the embryos don’t separate, sometimes you get a deer with an extra limb or two. The good news is while you get a really weird-looking deer with this deformity, it usually doesn’t prevent the animal from living a healthy life.

‘Sleigh Hoof’

Deer Deformities
QDMA

This uncommon deformity is often seen in cattle and even in other deer species, such as moose. However, it’s also seen in whitetails, and it definitely makes for a strange sight when a deer’s hooves grow disproportionately long.

Experts believe this type of deformity is caused by mineral imbalances. The buck in the photo above likely spent too much time eating high-carbohydrate foods at bait piles or deer-feeding stations. It looks painful, but it certainly didn’t stop the buck from growing a big rack.

‘Bullwinkle’ Syndrome

Deer Deformities
Facebook

A few photos of whitetail deer suffering with this rare condition have been making their way to the web in recent years. Obviously, the name comes from the cartoon moose, “Bullwinkle.”. This is what happens when a deer sufferers from a long-term bacterial inflammations in their mouth, nose or lips. These deformities are fairly new phenomenon and the QDMA recommends reporting them to your state wildlife agencies as soon as you see or shoot one.

Because of the bacterial nature of this deformity, scientists have advised against these deer for human consumption. Still, we think we’d have to pull the trigger anyway, if for no other reason than to put the animal out of its misery. This type of thing looks incredibly painful, but fortunately, this condition is extremely rare.

‘Cactus’ Racks

Deer Deformities
Facebook

This deformity is often the result of a buck who manages to injure his genitalia or has some other type of hormonal imbalance. It seems like several of these bucks are shot every year and it results in some of the most abnormal antlers ever seen by deer hunters. In many cases, the bucks don’t even shed the antlers, they just keep growing. Sometimes does grow these cactus racks, too.

Some of these “cactus” racks have actually resulted in some absolutely massive non-typical deer. But current Boone and Crockett and Pope and Young scoring systems don’t accept these deer into their record books. In fact, the clubs have declared more than one deer like this as “unscoreable” due to the freak nature of the antlers.

NEXT: #WHITETAILWEDNESDAY: 25 UNIQUE IDEAS FOR YOUR NEXT WHITETAIL MOUNT

WATCH

The post #WhitetailWednesday: 8 of the Strangest Deer Deformities Ever appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

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Hunting

How To Bowhunt Elk Right

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2018/10/how-to-bowhunt-elk-right/

10 Tips For Bow Hunting Elk

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

10 Tips for Bowhunting Elk

Whether you’re hunting with longbow, recurve, compound or crossbow, bowhunting elk can be the most exciting hunts you’ll ever experience. It can also be incredibly slow and actionless. Here are ten tips that will help make your fall elk hunt a great one.

1. Get in Shape
You’ve heard it before, but it bears repeating: Be in the best shape you can before your elk hunt. There are not many experiences as disheartening as watching a big bull and his harem pass just out of bow range because you were too winded to get into position. Focus on three areas: cardio, legs and weight bearing. Cardio so you can charge up those high-elevation hills when the moment of truth arrives; legs for the same reason; weight bearing because you’ll almost always have a pack on your shoulders—a heavy one if you take an elk.

2. Practice
Work with your chosen archery equipment until you’re comfortable shooting from your knees, under branches and over brush. Practice shooting steeply uphill and downhill; stretch your range as far as you ethically can. Shots can be long, steep and challenging in elk country, and the better prepared you are to make a tough shot the more likely you are to make meat.

3. Be Bivy Ready
One of the most effective tactics in my toolbox is to sleep on the mountain with the elk. Get a super-light bivy camping setup and learn how to use it. That way, you’ll have your camp on your back and be ready to spend the night wherever the elk take you. Make camp a few hundred yards downwind of the elk, moving with them at night if necessary, and make your stalk in the grey light of dawn. Elk expect you to be hiking up the trail that time of day, not in their bedroom.

4. Find Elk
The hardest part about elk hunting is often finding the elk. Employ three senses for this: hearing, sight and smell, in that order. Spend lots of time on ridge tops and vantage points listening for a distant bugle or a cow chirp. Scan distant hillsides with your binoculars while you listen. You can blow locating bugles to inspire elk to be vocal. Send a bugle, wait and listen for two minutes, then send another. After that, wait 15 minutes and try again. In areas with a lot of pressure from hunters or wolves, you may need to do this at night (don’t hunt at night, just locate), and pay attention to the wind. I’ve often found elk by their sweet barnyard odor drifting on the breeze.

5. Hunt Hidey-Holes
Elk don’t like pressure. If bothered by hunters or wolves they will dive into the nastiest, thickest, steepest places they can find. A bit of feed, a little water and a lot of security cover is all they need. If elk are scarce, start looking for gosh-awful nasty hidey-holes that other hunters are reluctant to venture into; you’ll have the elk all to yourself.

6. Sound Like an Elk
Nowadays elk have heard it all, and are rather adept at picking out a fake—especially the suspicious old matriarchs of the herd. The slightest mistake, and the elk you worked so hard to find will be headed for Canada. To circumvent this you need to call sparingly, and sound like a herd of elk. Snap twigs, rustle brush, and knock a stick against a deadfall log to sound like a hoof hitting. Rub a tree a little to sound like an aggressive bull. When you blow a cow call, only call one time. Often the first call will get the elk’s attention, the second will relay that you’re a fake. Wait a few minutes before calling again.

7. Tag-Team Bulls
The exception to the above advice is a testosterone-charged bull. If you find a bull that bugles immediately and hard in response to your cow calls, call back often and seductively. The best setup is done with two hunters, one working the calls, moving back and forth, snapping twigs and deploying a decoy if he’s got one. He can even move away, calling as he goes, if the bull hangs up out of range. The second hunter sets up 40 to 100 yards in front, on the downwind side of where he expects the bull to come through. This hunter should never call except to signal his partner that he’s in position or that he’s taken a shot. That way the bull’s attention is on the caller, and with luck he’ll walk right by the hunter, offering a close, clean shot opportunity.

8. Set Up in Front
One of the most common mistakes rooky elk hunters make is to set up with plenty of cover between them and where they expect the elk to show up. Leave your whitetail skills at home on this one, and set up with cover behind you to break up your outline, but only minimal cover in front. Compared to whitetails, elk can be pretty oblivious. Paint your face and hands, kneel on the ground with your bow at the ready, and hold still; elk will walk right by and never spot you.

9. Hunt Midday
Elk are very aware that most hunters head back to camp for lunch and a nap. They relax a bit, browse around and get a drink if one is handy. Bulls are often tired from rutting all night, but after a nice late-morning nap feel the urge to initiate a little action. It’s one of the best times to call a herd bull away from his harem. One of my favorite strategies is to set up downwind of a favored wallow and waterhole. If elk are nearby it’s only a matter of time till one shows up for a drink—and chances are good it’ll be the herd bull.

10. Be Aggressive
Timid hunters don’t kill many elk. Don’t hesitate to make an aggressive move if necessary. Move quickly to adjust your setup or cut off a herd. As a last-ditch effort, you can charge right into the herd. They’ll often mill in surprise for a few seconds, giving you a chance to arrow one of them. Once they bust and run, you can run after them for a minute, then call frantically like a lost cow—the herd bull just may turn around and come back for you. Another brazen tactic that can pay off big is moving in fast on a rubbing bull. If a bull is actively rubbing his antlers on a tree, his eyes are mostly shut. I’ve walked right up to within single-digit yards of bulls preoccupied with venting their frustrations on a tree. You can do the same; just close the distance fast, draw your bow and put a steady shot into his vitals. It’ll be your most exciting bowhunting experience ever.

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.net/2018/10/how-to-bowhunt-elk-right/

10 Tips For Bow Hunting Elk

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

10 Tips for Bowhunting Elk

Whether you’re hunting with longbow, recurve, compound or crossbow, bowhunting elk can be the most exciting hunts you’ll ever experience. It can also be incredibly slow and actionless. Here are ten tips that will help make your fall elk hunt a great one.

1. Get in Shape
You’ve heard it before, but it bears repeating: Be in the best shape you can before your elk hunt. There are not many experiences as disheartening as watching a big bull and his harem pass just out of bow range because you were too winded to get into position. Focus on three areas: cardio, legs and weight bearing. Cardio so you can charge up those high-elevation hills when the moment of truth arrives; legs for the same reason; weight bearing because you’ll almost always have a pack on your shoulders—a heavy one if you take an elk.

2. Practice
Work with your chosen archery equipment until you’re comfortable shooting from your knees, under branches and over brush. Practice shooting steeply uphill and downhill; stretch your range as far as you ethically can. Shots can be long, steep and challenging in elk country, and the better prepared you are to make a tough shot the more likely you are to make meat.

3. Be Bivy Ready
One of the most effective tactics in my toolbox is to sleep on the mountain with the elk. Get a super-light bivy camping setup and learn how to use it. That way, you’ll have your camp on your back and be ready to spend the night wherever the elk take you. Make camp a few hundred yards downwind of the elk, moving with them at night if necessary, and make your stalk in the grey light of dawn. Elk expect you to be hiking up the trail that time of day, not in their bedroom.

4. Find Elk
The hardest part about elk hunting is often finding the elk. Employ three senses for this: hearing, sight and smell, in that order. Spend lots of time on ridge tops and vantage points listening for a distant bugle or a cow chirp. Scan distant hillsides with your binoculars while you listen. You can blow locating bugles to inspire elk to be vocal. Send a bugle, wait and listen for two minutes, then send another. After that, wait 15 minutes and try again. In areas with a lot of pressure from hunters or wolves, you may need to do this at night (don’t hunt at night, just locate), and pay attention to the wind. I’ve often found elk by their sweet barnyard odor drifting on the breeze.

5. Hunt Hidey-Holes
Elk don’t like pressure. If bothered by hunters or wolves they will dive into the nastiest, thickest, steepest places they can find. A bit of feed, a little water and a lot of security cover is all they need. If elk are scarce, start looking for gosh-awful nasty hidey-holes that other hunters are reluctant to venture into; you’ll have the elk all to yourself.

6. Sound Like an Elk
Nowadays elk have heard it all, and are rather adept at picking out a fake—especially the suspicious old matriarchs of the herd. The slightest mistake, and the elk you worked so hard to find will be headed for Canada. To circumvent this you need to call sparingly, and sound like a herd of elk. Snap twigs, rustle brush, and knock a stick against a deadfall log to sound like a hoof hitting. Rub a tree a little to sound like an aggressive bull. When you blow a cow call, only call one time. Often the first call will get the elk’s attention, the second will relay that you’re a fake. Wait a few minutes before calling again.

7. Tag-Team Bulls
The exception to the above advice is a testosterone-charged bull. If you find a bull that bugles immediately and hard in response to your cow calls, call back often and seductively. The best setup is done with two hunters, one working the calls, moving back and forth, snapping twigs and deploying a decoy if he’s got one. He can even move away, calling as he goes, if the bull hangs up out of range. The second hunter sets up 40 to 100 yards in front, on the downwind side of where he expects the bull to come through. This hunter should never call except to signal his partner that he’s in position or that he’s taken a shot. That way the bull’s attention is on the caller, and with luck he’ll walk right by the hunter, offering a close, clean shot opportunity.

8. Set Up in Front
One of the most common mistakes rooky elk hunters make is to set up with plenty of cover between them and where they expect the elk to show up. Leave your whitetail skills at home on this one, and set up with cover behind you to break up your outline, but only minimal cover in front. Compared to whitetails, elk can be pretty oblivious. Paint your face and hands, kneel on the ground with your bow at the ready, and hold still; elk will walk right by and never spot you.

9. Hunt Midday
Elk are very aware that most hunters head back to camp for lunch and a nap. They relax a bit, browse around and get a drink if one is handy. Bulls are often tired from rutting all night, but after a nice late-morning nap feel the urge to initiate a little action. It’s one of the best times to call a herd bull away from his harem. One of my favorite strategies is to set up downwind of a favored wallow and waterhole. If elk are nearby it’s only a matter of time till one shows up for a drink—and chances are good it’ll be the herd bull.

10. Be Aggressive
Timid hunters don’t kill many elk. Don’t hesitate to make an aggressive move if necessary. Move quickly to adjust your setup or cut off a herd. As a last-ditch effort, you can charge right into the herd. They’ll often mill in surprise for a few seconds, giving you a chance to arrow one of them. Once they bust and run, you can run after them for a minute, then call frantically like a lost cow—the herd bull just may turn around and come back for you. Another brazen tactic that can pay off big is moving in fast on a rubbing bull. If a bull is actively rubbing his antlers on a tree, his eyes are mostly shut. I’ve walked right up to within single-digit yards of bulls preoccupied with venting their frustrations on a tree. You can do the same; just close the distance fast, draw your bow and put a steady shot into his vitals. It’ll be your most exciting bowhunting experience ever.

by Aram von Benedikt from American Hunter

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Continue Reading

Hunting

Calling Deer: Is It Too Early to Rattle?

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2018/10/18/calling-deer-is-it-too-early-to-rattle/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=calling-deer-is-it-too-early-to-rattle

Is mid-October too early to rattle up a buck? Calling deer is all about timing and real estate at this time of year. Here’s what you need to… Read more…

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Is mid-October too early to rattle up a buck? Calling deer is all about timing and real estate at this time of year. Here’s what you need to… Read more…

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Hunting

TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver Review

Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2018/10/18/tightspot-7-arrow-quiver/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tightspot-7-arrow-quiver

Take a look at one of the best arrow quivers in the business in our TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver review, including photos, specs, and video…. Read more…

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Posted from: https://www.bowhunting.com/blog/2018/10/18/tightspot-7-arrow-quiver/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tightspot-7-arrow-quiver

Take a look at one of the best arrow quivers in the business in our TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver review, including photos, specs, and video…. Read more…

The post TightSpot 7-Arrow Quiver Review appeared first on Bowhunting.com.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
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For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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