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Your Health In The Backcountry

Posted from: https://blog.eastmans.com/your-healthin-the-backcountry/

 

Alaska Wilderness Hunt and Health Study

    In the fall of 2017 I headed to the wilderness of Alaska to fulfill a 20-year dream of hunting caribou and moose in the largest and most remote state in the Union. A DIY float hunt was the plan and the adventure that awaited wouldn’t disappoint.

    On this type of trip, one doesn’t know what to expect. What will the river character be? Will we see any animals we can harvest? If we do see the wildlife species we were after, would they be mature trophy species we dreamed of? What weather conditions would we be dealing with and how would they affect survival mode for a total of 12 days in the backcountry? However, one more question popped up as the hunt was drawing near and it didn’t have anything to do with the hunt specifically.

My friend and Alaska contact, Larry Bartlett, asked if we would participate in a health study that has never been done before. A study that would focus on the energy and caloric demands of wilderness hunters – the group that probably most closely resemble the nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyles of certain ancient peoples.

The last question that popped in my head as we were asked to participate in this groundbreaking study was, will this study interfere with my once-in-a-lifetime dream hunt? Being someone with a biology degree, I was extremely interested in being one of the chosen “lab rats”, but it definitely couldn’t negatively impact the hunt and mission at hand.

Plus, like many backcountry hunters, I’ve always noticed extreme changes in body composition over a 5-10 day hunt where physical exertion is extreme and food is usually less than gourmet. I wanted to know exactly what is happening biologically to my muscle and fat mass. Is backcountry weight loss a product of fat AND muscle loss or is it possible to maintain and/or increase muscle mass while losing visceral fat and overall body fat under these nutrition and exertion levels?

My hunting partner, Casey Anderson (also a biologist), and I were on board with this experiment Larry informed us of. The study/experiment, conducted by Dr. Robert Coker,from the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, began two days prior to our wilderness bush flight. Dr. Coker met us at our hotel room and informed us about the use of a water based isotope and the  daily urine samples we had to take and transport with us down the river (we hereby named this adventure “Ur-ine (You’re In) Alaska”) to help measure our energy expenditure. We were also asked to keep a meal diary to track our total energy intake on this 80 river-mile float hunt.

The next day found us at the state-of-the-art University lab for a pre-hunt weigh-in, MRI scan (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and DEXA (Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry) scans to measure body composition, and an oxygen-consumption measuring exercise on a stationary bike with increasing levels of resistance.

Finally! The first day of the adventure arrives and we are dropped in the Alaskan wilderness for a 10-day float hunt, 12-day total time away from civilization. As you can tell from the Beyond The Grid webisode, the adventure didn’t disappoint! (You will also notice a couple of times when Casey couldn’t resist looking at the camera and saying, “Ur-ine (You’re In) Alaska!” Needless to say there were a lot of sarcastic urine comments when traveling 80 miles of river in the wilderness and toting 12 urine vials with. Glad those Zip-Loc bags didn’t leak!!!!)

Casey harvested a dandy caribou on day 2 of the float, which meant we had several days of meat care ahead of us, leading to additional daily chores and exertion. After each morning hunt we’d tear down camp and load rafts, taking special precautions to leave no trace of our existence for future hunters floating this particular river. Each evening we’d unload rafts on a new gravel bar, make camp, and hunt until dark. Doing this for 10-12 days is just plain physically and mentally exhausting, no matter what type of shape you are in.

The day after we made it back to Fairbanks, courtesy of our trusty bush pilot, we once again checked in at the University of Alaska Fairbanks lab for the post-hunt MRI and DEXA scans, and the measurement of peak oxygen consumption during exercise. Even the initial weigh-in results post-hunt were amazing! I began the trip at my “fighting” weight of 205 lbs (I’m 6’2” tall) and had a post-hunt weight of 190 lbs. That is a weight loss of 15 lbs from a frame that was in lean-shape before the hunt even began – a weight I haven’t been at for over 20 years!!! Casey noticed similar results as well.

Several months later, Dr. Coker and his team presented and defended their findings at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Minneapolis, MN. They recently published the data in the scientific journal, Physiological Reports.  Here is a synopsis of the study, officially titled The Caloric Costs and Metabolic Benefits of Wilderness Hunting in Alaska:

 

There was a decrease in body weight, total fat mass and visceral fat volume. In contrast, total leg and arm lean tissue mass were preserved. CONCLUSION: In the context of a chronic caloric deficit elicited by over 4k calories of energy expenditure/day, adipose tissue and IHL decreased without any reduction in lean tissue mass or muscle mass. These alterations may reflect the interactive influence of movement constancy and caloric deficit on the health benefits of the hunter-gatherer lifestyle.

 

    Here’s the Brandon Mason paraphrase: living an active hunting lifestyle is good for you! Theodore Roosevelt poetically stated, “Only he who has partaken thereof, can appreciate the keen delight of hunting in lonely lands.” Hunting and living the outdoors lifestyle is not only good for your soul, but is also great for your body. Dr. Coker’s team is actively continuing this study to further understand the demands of this type of lifestyle. We will continue to monitor the results and update you if updates are warranted.

    Get prepared. Stay prepared. Hunt hard!

 

The post Your Health In The Backcountry appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Posted from: https://blog.eastmans.com/your-healthin-the-backcountry/

 

Alaska Wilderness Hunt and Health Study

    In the fall of 2017 I headed to the wilderness of Alaska to fulfill a 20-year dream of hunting caribou and moose in the largest and most remote state in the Union. A DIY float hunt was the plan and the adventure that awaited wouldn’t disappoint.

    On this type of trip, one doesn’t know what to expect. What will the river character be? Will we see any animals we can harvest? If we do see the wildlife species we were after, would they be mature trophy species we dreamed of? What weather conditions would we be dealing with and how would they affect survival mode for a total of 12 days in the backcountry? However, one more question popped up as the hunt was drawing near and it didn’t have anything to do with the hunt specifically.

My friend and Alaska contact, Larry Bartlett, asked if we would participate in a health study that has never been done before. A study that would focus on the energy and caloric demands of wilderness hunters – the group that probably most closely resemble the nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyles of certain ancient peoples.

The last question that popped in my head as we were asked to participate in this groundbreaking study was, will this study interfere with my once-in-a-lifetime dream hunt? Being someone with a biology degree, I was extremely interested in being one of the chosen “lab rats”, but it definitely couldn’t negatively impact the hunt and mission at hand.

Plus, like many backcountry hunters, I’ve always noticed extreme changes in body composition over a 5-10 day hunt where physical exertion is extreme and food is usually less than gourmet. I wanted to know exactly what is happening biologically to my muscle and fat mass. Is backcountry weight loss a product of fat AND muscle loss or is it possible to maintain and/or increase muscle mass while losing visceral fat and overall body fat under these nutrition and exertion levels?

My hunting partner, Casey Anderson (also a biologist), and I were on board with this experiment Larry informed us of. The study/experiment, conducted by Dr. Robert Coker,from the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, began two days prior to our wilderness bush flight. Dr. Coker met us at our hotel room and informed us about the use of a water based isotope and the  daily urine samples we had to take and transport with us down the river (we hereby named this adventure “Ur-ine (You’re In) Alaska”) to help measure our energy expenditure. We were also asked to keep a meal diary to track our total energy intake on this 80 river-mile float hunt.

The next day found us at the state-of-the-art University lab for a pre-hunt weigh-in, MRI scan (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and DEXA (Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry) scans to measure body composition, and an oxygen-consumption measuring exercise on a stationary bike with increasing levels of resistance.

Finally! The first day of the adventure arrives and we are dropped in the Alaskan wilderness for a 10-day float hunt, 12-day total time away from civilization. As you can tell from the Beyond The Grid webisode, the adventure didn’t disappoint! (You will also notice a couple of times when Casey couldn’t resist looking at the camera and saying, “Ur-ine (You’re In) Alaska!” Needless to say there were a lot of sarcastic urine comments when traveling 80 miles of river in the wilderness and toting 12 urine vials with. Glad those Zip-Loc bags didn’t leak!!!!)

Casey harvested a dandy caribou on day 2 of the float, which meant we had several days of meat care ahead of us, leading to additional daily chores and exertion. After each morning hunt we’d tear down camp and load rafts, taking special precautions to leave no trace of our existence for future hunters floating this particular river. Each evening we’d unload rafts on a new gravel bar, make camp, and hunt until dark. Doing this for 10-12 days is just plain physically and mentally exhausting, no matter what type of shape you are in.

The day after we made it back to Fairbanks, courtesy of our trusty bush pilot, we once again checked in at the University of Alaska Fairbanks lab for the post-hunt MRI and DEXA scans, and the measurement of peak oxygen consumption during exercise. Even the initial weigh-in results post-hunt were amazing! I began the trip at my “fighting” weight of 205 lbs (I’m 6’2” tall) and had a post-hunt weight of 190 lbs. That is a weight loss of 15 lbs from a frame that was in lean-shape before the hunt even began – a weight I haven’t been at for over 20 years!!! Casey noticed similar results as well.

Several months later, Dr. Coker and his team presented and defended their findings at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Minneapolis, MN. They recently published the data in the scientific journal, Physiological Reports.  Here is a synopsis of the study, officially titled The Caloric Costs and Metabolic Benefits of Wilderness Hunting in Alaska:

 

There was a decrease in body weight, total fat mass and visceral fat volume. In contrast, total leg and arm lean tissue mass were preserved. CONCLUSION: In the context of a chronic caloric deficit elicited by over 4k calories of energy expenditure/day, adipose tissue and IHL decreased without any reduction in lean tissue mass or muscle mass. These alterations may reflect the interactive influence of movement constancy and caloric deficit on the health benefits of the hunter-gatherer lifestyle.

 

    Here’s the Brandon Mason paraphrase: living an active hunting lifestyle is good for you! Theodore Roosevelt poetically stated, “Only he who has partaken thereof, can appreciate the keen delight of hunting in lonely lands.” Hunting and living the outdoors lifestyle is not only good for your soul, but is also great for your body. Dr. Coker’s team is actively continuing this study to further understand the demands of this type of lifestyle. We will continue to monitor the results and update you if updates are warranted.

    Get prepared. Stay prepared. Hunt hard!

 

The post Your Health In The Backcountry appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

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Hunting

Ep. 263: Reviewing Trends from the 2018 Whitetail Season

Posted from: http://wiredtohunt.com/2019/01/20/ep-263-reviewing-trends-from-the-2018-whitetail-season/

Today is the final part of our two-part 2018 review and in this episode Spencer and I review trends and observations about the 2018 deer hunting season across the country. Subjects Discussed Revisiting a few of the big takeaways from…

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Published

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Posted from: http://wiredtohunt.com/2019/01/20/ep-263-reviewing-trends-from-the-2018-whitetail-season/

Today is the final part of our two-part 2018 review and in this episode Spencer and I review trends and observations about the 2018 deer hunting season across the country. Subjects Discussed Revisiting a few of the big takeaways from…

Follow FreaknHunting on Instagram @ http://instagram.com/freaknhunting
Catch us on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/freaknhunting
For the hat trick, we’re on Facebook @ https://facebook.com/FreaknHunting/

Continue Reading

Hunting

18 Baby Names Perfect for Your Little Outdoorsman

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/18-baby-names-for-your-little-outdoorsman/

Pinterest
baby names 2016

If you’re expecting a baby boy this year, consider these 18 baby names that reflect the joy of the outdoors.

Are you expecting a baby boy in the future? Maybe you’re doing everything you can persuade your spouse to consider some baby names that are hunting or fishing-related.

Regardless of your situation, here are the best baby names for your future little outdoorsman. He will be cute, cuddly and rugged all at the same time. Many of these may need no explanation; however, some may need some investigating to get to the full meaning.

1. Hunter

baby names 2016
Pinterest

Okay, so this one is plain and simple, but it’s still a cute name for your little peanut.

2. Mariner

Mariner is a Celtic baby name meaning “lives by the sea.”

3. Bowman

Two words put together to make one unique name for your bundle of joy.

4. Remington

baby names 2016
Jessica Myers Photography

Not only is this just a name of one of the largest firearm manufacturers, but it’s quite the common first name for many boys born in the ’90’s.

5. Scout

“Hey Scout!” Not to be confused with Scott. Although I could see this being more of a nickname than a baby name. Either way, given this name, he’s bound to be on a journey full of adventure.

6. Colt

Has anyone ever seen the “3 Ninja’s” move series growing up? No? Well, one of the little ninjas was Colt and although you may not be having a ninja baby, if you are a cowboy or into horses or want to relate it to the revolver, this is a name for you new son.

7. Miles

The Latin meaning of ‘Miles’ is soldier. A soldier can be more than one who heads off to war, but someone who conquers challenges. Soldiers in our military are what allow us to hunt and fish and live with freedom so never to take away from the respect of our men and women who serve, many times hunters are soldiers.

Those who head out into the woods with a pack and a weapon, fighting the altitude, weather and terrain to hunt and harvest an animal of a lifetime too is much like a soldier, and Miles, well, Miles is a soldier.

8. Easton

Pronounced, spelled and sounding just like the archery arrow manufacturer, because that’s where we got it from.

9. Oakley

baby names 2016
Pinterest

This name is very unique and in some countries is a unisex name, for both girls and boys. There’s more to it than a fancy pair of sunglasses, as it’s true meaning is “A Field of Oak Trees”. Earth, nature and the outdoors, just where most fishermen and hunters like to spend their time.

10. Tanner

There are those who think immediately of the Tanner Family from Full House and if you weren’t, I may have just ruined it for you. If you’re still interested, when someone in taxidermy prepares an animal hide, they “tan” the hide. You little boy may just grow up to be the next best taxidermist with a very ironic first name for the job.

11. Dallas

baby names 2016
Pinterest

According to the Name Meaning Website, Dallas means “Wise, Meadow Stance.” I first thought of the name when my younger sister told me she was moving to Houston and instead of saying, “Congratulations! Good luck!” I said, “Awesome, make some friends who have hunting property!” Then I soon began searching the internet at places to hunt in Texas and many times found myself looking at flights into Dallas, TX.

I’m not sure why my mind thinks in this way, but regardless, if you name your newborn Dallas and he grows to have hunting property, don’t forget me and be sure to remember where the name idea came from!

12. Forrest/Forest

I like the double “r” here more than one, but however you spell it, let’s keep it related to the outdoors and not Forrest Gump! Your little one may not be a runner, but surely will love the outdoors if given the opportunity to.

13. Gauge

We understand the name “Double Barrel” or “Over-Under” wouldn’t suffice, and plus, Gauge just sounds like a really cool name. If you relate it to your shotgun or name your future son, Gauge is unique and a great name for the future outdoorsman.

14. Archer

baby names 2016
Lullaby Lane Photography

He may end up being more into firearms or fishing, but either way, Archer will be an outdoorsman and he will look good in that cute little camo onesie you got him for his ride home from the hospital.

15. Drake

baby names 2016
Pinterest

If you’re listening to the radio, you may be thinking of the hip-hop artist Drake, but I can assure you we’re relating this to the male duck, which happens to be the same name of your new little duckling.

16. Cam

Just because the term “String” and “Limb” didn’t work when we were naming parts of a compound bow. Cam. It’s got a nice ring to it.

17. Fletcher

So he may not grow up to own a pro shop and cut arrows, but he can always stand proud with the name Fletcher. Steer him into the right path, or flight, when the stork drops off your newborn.

18. Wyatt

This baby name has been popular this part year, signifying strength and bravery. Hunters and fisherman both go that extra mile for their adrenaline rush and harvest as they make their way against mother nature. They, like their parents, are strong minded and goal oriented and Wyatt, will be no different.

It’s not doubt if you are having a new baby, you have spent some time on the internet or in baby name books looking for that perfect match.

If you’re a couple who loves the outdoors or individually trying to convince your spouse to keep the name related to hunting or fishing, these are just a few to get you started. It may not be as easy as naming a puppy or kitten, but it will be as special if not more special.

Did you find one you like? Do you know someone who could use this list? Or is your very own name on this list? Be sure to comment and let us know if you have any more to add to the list as well.

NEXT: 10 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD NEVER MARRY A HUNTER

oembed rumble video here

The post 18 Baby Names Perfect for Your Little Outdoorsman appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

on

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/18-baby-names-for-your-little-outdoorsman/

Pinterest
baby names 2016

If you’re expecting a baby boy this year, consider these 18 baby names that reflect the joy of the outdoors.

Are you expecting a baby boy in the future? Maybe you’re doing everything you can persuade your spouse to consider some baby names that are hunting or fishing-related.

Regardless of your situation, here are the best baby names for your future little outdoorsman. He will be cute, cuddly and rugged all at the same time. Many of these may need no explanation; however, some may need some investigating to get to the full meaning.

1. Hunter

baby names 2016
Pinterest

Okay, so this one is plain and simple, but it’s still a cute name for your little peanut.

2. Mariner

Mariner is a Celtic baby name meaning “lives by the sea.”

3. Bowman

Two words put together to make one unique name for your bundle of joy.

4. Remington

baby names 2016
Jessica Myers Photography

Not only is this just a name of one of the largest firearm manufacturers, but it’s quite the common first name for many boys born in the ’90’s.

5. Scout

“Hey Scout!” Not to be confused with Scott. Although I could see this being more of a nickname than a baby name. Either way, given this name, he’s bound to be on a journey full of adventure.

6. Colt

Has anyone ever seen the “3 Ninja’s” move series growing up? No? Well, one of the little ninjas was Colt and although you may not be having a ninja baby, if you are a cowboy or into horses or want to relate it to the revolver, this is a name for you new son.

7. Miles

The Latin meaning of ‘Miles’ is soldier. A soldier can be more than one who heads off to war, but someone who conquers challenges. Soldiers in our military are what allow us to hunt and fish and live with freedom so never to take away from the respect of our men and women who serve, many times hunters are soldiers.

Those who head out into the woods with a pack and a weapon, fighting the altitude, weather and terrain to hunt and harvest an animal of a lifetime too is much like a soldier, and Miles, well, Miles is a soldier.

8. Easton

Pronounced, spelled and sounding just like the archery arrow manufacturer, because that’s where we got it from.

9. Oakley

baby names 2016
Pinterest

This name is very unique and in some countries is a unisex name, for both girls and boys. There’s more to it than a fancy pair of sunglasses, as it’s true meaning is “A Field of Oak Trees”. Earth, nature and the outdoors, just where most fishermen and hunters like to spend their time.

10. Tanner

There are those who think immediately of the Tanner Family from Full House and if you weren’t, I may have just ruined it for you. If you’re still interested, when someone in taxidermy prepares an animal hide, they “tan” the hide. You little boy may just grow up to be the next best taxidermist with a very ironic first name for the job.

11. Dallas

baby names 2016
Pinterest

According to the Name Meaning Website, Dallas means “Wise, Meadow Stance.” I first thought of the name when my younger sister told me she was moving to Houston and instead of saying, “Congratulations! Good luck!” I said, “Awesome, make some friends who have hunting property!” Then I soon began searching the internet at places to hunt in Texas and many times found myself looking at flights into Dallas, TX.

I’m not sure why my mind thinks in this way, but regardless, if you name your newborn Dallas and he grows to have hunting property, don’t forget me and be sure to remember where the name idea came from!

12. Forrest/Forest

I like the double “r” here more than one, but however you spell it, let’s keep it related to the outdoors and not Forrest Gump! Your little one may not be a runner, but surely will love the outdoors if given the opportunity to.

13. Gauge

We understand the name “Double Barrel” or “Over-Under” wouldn’t suffice, and plus, Gauge just sounds like a really cool name. If you relate it to your shotgun or name your future son, Gauge is unique and a great name for the future outdoorsman.

14. Archer

baby names 2016
Lullaby Lane Photography

He may end up being more into firearms or fishing, but either way, Archer will be an outdoorsman and he will look good in that cute little camo onesie you got him for his ride home from the hospital.

15. Drake

baby names 2016
Pinterest

If you’re listening to the radio, you may be thinking of the hip-hop artist Drake, but I can assure you we’re relating this to the male duck, which happens to be the same name of your new little duckling.

16. Cam

Just because the term “String” and “Limb” didn’t work when we were naming parts of a compound bow. Cam. It’s got a nice ring to it.

17. Fletcher

So he may not grow up to own a pro shop and cut arrows, but he can always stand proud with the name Fletcher. Steer him into the right path, or flight, when the stork drops off your newborn.

18. Wyatt

This baby name has been popular this part year, signifying strength and bravery. Hunters and fisherman both go that extra mile for their adrenaline rush and harvest as they make their way against mother nature. They, like their parents, are strong minded and goal oriented and Wyatt, will be no different.

It’s not doubt if you are having a new baby, you have spent some time on the internet or in baby name books looking for that perfect match.

If you’re a couple who loves the outdoors or individually trying to convince your spouse to keep the name related to hunting or fishing, these are just a few to get you started. It may not be as easy as naming a puppy or kitten, but it will be as special if not more special.

Did you find one you like? Do you know someone who could use this list? Or is your very own name on this list? Be sure to comment and let us know if you have any more to add to the list as well.

NEXT: 10 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD NEVER MARRY A HUNTER

oembed rumble video here

The post 18 Baby Names Perfect for Your Little Outdoorsman appeared first on Wide Open Spaces.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Continue Reading

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ATA 2019: Top New Hunting Boots and Clothing

https://www.deeranddeerhunting.com/articles/deer-hunting-gear/ata-2019-top-new-hunting-boots-and-clothing

ATA 2019: Top New Hunting Boots and Clothing

It’s no secret that warm, dry and comfortable gear makes for happy hunting, and the gear improves every year. Check out what the DDH team found at the ATA Show.

The post ATA 2019: Top New Hunting Boots and Clothing appeared first on Deer & Deer Hunting | Whitetail Deer Hunting Tips.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Published

on

https://www.deeranddeerhunting.com/articles/deer-hunting-gear/ata-2019-top-new-hunting-boots-and-clothing

ATA 2019: Top New Hunting Boots and Clothing

It’s no secret that warm, dry and comfortable gear makes for happy hunting, and the gear improves every year. Check out what the DDH team found at the ATA Show.

The post ATA 2019: Top New Hunting Boots and Clothing appeared first on Deer & Deer Hunting | Whitetail Deer Hunting Tips.

Follow us on Twitter @freaknhunting
Follow us on Instagram @freaknhunting

Continue Reading

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